Dutch VVD finds death penalty acceptable to Dutch IS people / Where are “our values” now, VVD?

Dutch VVD finds death penalty acceptable to Dutch IS people / Where are “our values” now, VVD?

VVD FIND THE DEATH PENALTY FOR DUTCH IS ‘ERS ACCEPTABEL / WHERE ARE “OUR VALUES”, VVD “?

ALSO SEE
Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.
Our way of life, we just talked about homosexuality, we talk about man and woman in the Netherlands.
We are talking about our achievements, which come from humanism, from Enlightenment, which we have built up over hundreds of years. “
 SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES
MARK RUTTE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mx04YMtMDZs

“Article 2 Right to life 1. Everyone has the right to life. 2. No one is sentenced to death or executed. “
CHARTER OF FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION
“The European Union is against the death penalty in all cases and in all circumstances. Abolition of the death penalty around the world is one of the main objectives of EU human rights policy. “
EUROPE NOW:
EUROPE EMPHASIZES THAT THE PUNCTION SHOULD BE ABOLISHED WORLDWIDE
” “Capital punishment is inhumane and unnecessary. Experience has also shown that it does not serve as a deterrent to crime. No legal system is flawless; any miscarriage of justice could lead to the tragic loss of an innocent life. ”
EUROPEAN UNION
JOINT DECLARATION  BY TJORBJORN JAGLAND, SECRETARY GENERAL OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE AND CATHERINE ASHTON, EUROPEAN UNION HIGH REPRESENTATIVE FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND SECURITY POLICY, ON THE EUROPEAN AND WORLD DAY AGAINST THE DEATH PENALTY, 10 OCTOBER 2012
“The EU is the largest sponsor in the fight against the death penalty worldwide. All EU countries have abolished the death penalty in accordance with the  European Convention on Human Rights . “
NEWS
EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT
PUNCTION: IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT THE SITUATION IN EUROPE AND THE REST OF THE WORLD
12 MARCH 2019
My old enemy, the People’s Party for Demonization, sorry, the VVD, is once again underway.
About that in a moment:
Not without reason the VVD is an old enemy:
I call the demonization, including discriminatory statements made and discriminatory proposals made [not complete!] [1], cooperation with the fascist PVV [2] in a “tolerance cabinet” [3], their “war” fired after the murder of T van Gogh [4] and attacks in a Paris concert hall [5]
And yes, I just call it separate, because it was quite shocking:
Prime Minister Rutte’s “Pleur op” statement [directed against a number of Turkish youths,
who were hit by the press] in 2016 [6, see also above] and not to mention his (in my eyes) notorious “Letter to all Dutchmen”, in which he lashed out at migrants who, according to him, did not do “normal” . [7]
But should we be surprised at the statements of a prime minister who was convicted as State Secretary for Social Affairs for inciting discrimination? [8]
I do not think so!
And then I leave all the cuts of the Rutte disaster cabinets [WITH support from the PvdA, let’s not forget that!] Just for what they are, but they are not tender either!
Maybe another time about that
But first this
DEATH PENALTY IS WARRIORS
Just when you think that old Enemy VVD cannot sink deeper, we get:
The VVD, through Mrs. Dilan Yesilgoz (because she did not come up with that on her own of course), finds it acceptable that Dutch IS fighters should be sentenced to death if they were tried in Iraq ……… [ 9]
TSJA, DAT hit like a bomb.
At least with me.
Before I learn this, to be honest:
French IS fighters, nine in total [so far], have been sentenced to death in Iraq,
which may be due to the fact that France did not try to get these people back. [10]
Something the Netherlands also categorically refuses. [11]
And I believe that if recall and in the country where they came from, the death penalty can occur, that it should be used.
Yet there is a difference between that French case and that VVD attitude:
Because the French have stated [and I assume for a moment, that this is indeed true, although I cannot rule out that it is nice to talk to the camera] that they will at least try to prevent those death sentences. [12]
The VVD, on the other hand, is not just a party, but GOVERNMENT PARTY, which the prime minister has provided, finds it “acceptable” that the death penalty be possibly carried out!
And so I do not taste any willingness to go to the extreme, to prevent those death sentences, should it come to that.
On the contrary.
And that the Netherlands [suppose that this idiotic VVD position is adopted, the chance of which is not so great at the moment] can therefore immediately have a hand in it and could therefore have blood on its hands, it shows that the Netherlands could possibly Iraq IS wants to try fighters [13], which was already an idiotic idea anyway, because it is known that Iraq knows the death penalty.
Moreover, the judicial process in Iraq is no more than a kangaroo Court, [14] in other words:
Does not comply at all with international standards regarding a fair trial. [15]
But that aside, because I am now talking about this open “death penalty”
VVD idea, although I am not going that far yet, that I want to call the VVD, the People’s Party for the Death Penalty!
CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
FIRST ARGUMENT / INHUMAN AND INFRINGEMENT OF THE RIGHT TO LIFE

I am a declared and fundamental opposition to the death penalty.

There are a number of reasons for this, but in the first – and most important – a principle, namely the violation of the right to life, as laid down in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. [16]
I believe that everyone has that right, including those who have violated that right vis-à-vis others.
In addition, apart from the way in which the death penalty is carried out [from barbaric to “humane” in quotation marks then!], I think that the death penalty is a barbaric and cruel punishment that no longer fits our time.
I cannot help quoting the Bible statement in this regard: “for He makes His sun rise over the evil and the good, and rains over the just and the unjust.” [17]
SECOND ARGUMENT:
THE “VERGIS” DEATH PENALTY WHAT IS IT THE WRONG PERSON?

Another compelling argument that should also make proponents of the death penalty think is the so-called VERGISDOODSTRAF

A legal form of “mistaken murder” actually.
Yes, because what if the wrong person was executed?

Then the Injustice can no longer be reversed, which IS of course possible with imprisonment, whereby the person concerned – rightfully – also receives hefty compensation.

A hypothetical case, escaped from a horror story?
NOT AT ALL!

Because whether it is due to the clumsiness of the judge, the police and / or the Public Prosecution Service, a conscious and successful attempt by the real killer to trick someone else into it, aggressive racism such as in the South of the US, or a conscious attempt by the police / Justice, someone or a group of people to put in, it happens and History has several examples of which I will name a few:

SCOTTSBORO BOYS

The Scottsboro boys, where a number of black teenagers have been accused of raping two white women, a crime punishable by death in deeply racist Alabama.

Thanks to strong solidarity from the American Communist Parties, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), which publicized this issue worldwide, the death penalty was prevented.

Later it was convincingly proven that they were all innocent. [18]

The southern American racist “right” system was not responsible, but what if they were executed …?

GUILDFORD FOUR AND MAGUIRE SEVEN

Another example of judicial error with the similarity with the Scottsboro boys, that here too “Justice” tried to trick the people involved into it were the cases of “The Guildford Four” and the “Maguire Seven” [19]

In both cases, groups of Irish nationals living in England were accused [and convicted] of attacks committed by the IRA [20] and in which they were allegedly involved.

In the case of the Guildford Four, there was “police coercion” and, under pressure, they “confessed”, with the “Maguire Seven” there was deliberate opposition from the police and all kinds of errors in the case itself.

Eventually all the convicts still alive were rehabilitated, because it had become clear that they had nothing to do with it. [21]

Suppose they were put to death …

Several times I have protested against the death penalty through articles / calls [22]

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL EN HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH

But now an opinion that is much more important than mine:

Human rights organizations Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, of which States and

Representatives should be concerned about:

Both use the same principle as I do:

They are against the death penalty as being a “cruel and inhuman punishment”

I quote Amnesty International:

””The death penalty is the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. Amnesty opposes the death penalty in all cases without exception – regardless of who is accused, the nature or circumstances of thecrime, guilt or innocence or method of execution. ” [23]

I quote Human Rights Watch

””The cornerstone of human rights is respect for the inherent dignity of all human beings and the inviolability of the human person. Human Rights Watch opposes capital punishment in all countries and in all circumstances because the inherent dignity of the person is inconsistent with the death penalty. This form of punishment is unique in its cruelty and finality, and it is inevitably and universally plagued with arbitrariness, prejudice, and error.” [24]

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

EU SAYS NO!

But for Dilan Yesilgoz and her other VVD associates with their idiotic “acceptance” of the death penalty for IS fighters, after trial before the Kangaroo Court in Iraq [25], let me stay closer to home.

With the EU,

Because what does the EU say about the death penalty?

I quote

Article 2, Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union

“Article 2 Right to life 1. Everyone has the right to life. 2. No one is sentenced to death or executed. “[26]

On the World Day and the European Day against the Death Penalty
Thorbjorn Jagland, Secretary General of the Council of Europe and Catherine Ashton, High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security, issued the following statement:
”“Capital punishment is inhumane and unnecessary. Experience has also shown that it does not serve as a deterrent to crime. No legal system is flawless; any miscarriage of justice could lead to the tragic loss of an innocent life. ” [27]
I also read on the website of the European Parliament
“The EU is the largest sponsor in the fight against the death penalty worldwide. All EU countries have abolished the death penalty in accordance with the  European Convention on Human Rights .

The EU is fighting in various ways against the abolition of the death penalty ”[28]

TSJA, that seems to me “clear and ready” to speak with Dutch Prime Minister Rutte. [29]
And to quote him further
Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model. “[30]
It is therefore very strange that the VVD expresses a death penalty position
that goes directly against not only the humanitarian values ​​of human rights organizations, but also against EU policies and principles.
Because the Netherlands is still a member of the EU
Or has there never been a Nexit [31] without my knowledge?
AGAIN DILAN YESILGOZ
Still, I cannot deny Dilan Yesilgoz, with her interpretation of the nasty VVD death penalty scenario, a glimmer of humanity in this matter:
For example, this lady stated some time ago that it must be possible to retrieve very young children of Dutch IS fighters without their parents.
I quote a part from the NRC
” If it is possible to bring” very small children “without their parents to the Netherlands, Yesilgöz says:” You can talk about that because they can’t do anything about it either. ” goals. “[32]
Although a glimmer of humanity, in itself strange, because according to International Law children cannot be separated from their parents. [33]
In addition, the circumstances in the camps in which they reside are so bad that, in humanitarian terms, you cannot leave those women there, I think. [34]
Human rights watch organization Human Rights Watch also urges the recovery of women and children from those camps. [35]
But unfortunately, the humanity of Dilan Yesilgoz seemed short-lived:
Because as a result of a court ruling, it states that the Netherlands
 has a best efforts obligation towards “IS children”
[strange term], which means that the Netherlands must get them back [36], noticed ‘
said VVD foreman on [I quote the NOS]
“” I hope the Dutch state will continue to sue, “says VVD MP Yesilgöz. “We do not want these children back. And certainly not their parents. “[37]
This hard position is at odds with the opinion of the Ombudsman for Children, who believes that the children should be taken back, [38] which is also the position of the human rights organization Human Rights Watch. [39]
Hereby a description, by the judge, of the living conditions of the children in the camps
[in Capital Letters, to make the reader aware of the horror!]
JUDGE:
”FROM VARIOUS SOURCES, IT CAN BE CREATED THAT CHILDREN MAKE THEM WITH BOMBARDEMENTS, SEXUAL ABUSE, TORTURE, ABSENCE OF EDUCATION, CHILD LOSS, FROZEN COLD IN WINTER, OVERCUMING, AVOIDABLE DISEASE, AND ANOTHER DISEASED INDIVIDUAL DISEASES AMENITIES AND MEDICAL CARE.
THERE IS THEREFORE A SERIOUS AND ACUTE EMERGENCY SITUATION, IN WHICH THE CHILDREN STAND AS A VICTIM OF THEIR PARENTS.
AND ACCORDING TO MY JUDGMENT THE STATE IS BASED ON THE BASIS OF THE
SOCIAL CAREFULNESS AND TO THE EXTENT INSIDE HIS POWER:
TO ATTRACT THE WRITING LOT OF THOSE DUTCH CHILDREN.
AND THE STATE MUST REASONALLY TAKE POSSIBLE MEASURES TO PROTECT THESE DUTCH CHILDREN.
THE CHILDREN ARE ALSO IN ANOTHER STATE. “[40]
Could Yesilgöz and her other VVD party members have ever heard of the Convention on the Rights of the Child? [41]
It is “clear and ready” [42] [we keep that in, hahaha] that the circumstances in those Syrian camps are in conflict with the Children’s Rights Convention! [43]
Some articles from that Treaty to clarify that?
Child interests:
Article 3 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child states
”In all actions concerning children, whether undertaken by public or private social welfare institutions, courts of law, administrative authorities or legislative bodies, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration”
Needless to say, the deplorable conditions in the Syrian camps violate the interests of the children.
Article 2 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child states
”State Parties shall respect and ensure the rights set forth in the present Convention to each child within their jurisdiction without discrimination of any kind, irrespective of the child’s or his or her parents’ or legal guardian’s race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national, ethnic or social origin, property, disability, birth or other status.
No distinction in rights!
Those rights therefore also apply to “IS children”
FURTHER:
The judge speaks about bombing in the verdict:
Children may die
The judge also speaks of child mortality:
Article 6, the Convention on the Rights of the Child guarantees the right to life of every child
The judge speaks about sexual abuse that children may be confronted with:
Article 19 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child prohibits this and requires the State to protect the child.
The judge speaks about torture with which children can be confronted [speaks about physical or mental violence, injury or abuse]:
 Article 19 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child prohibits this and requires the State to protect the child.
The judge speaks about lack of medical care:
Article 24. Children’s rights treaty guarantees for the child “the highest attainable standard of health and facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health”
and the protection by the State.
The judge speaks about the absence of education
Article 28 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child guarantees the right to education.
[44]
That seems clear to me.
Cliff and ready!
The State has, moreover, appealed against the court’s judgment … [45]
Did you know that, readers?
Talking about “our values” [46]
VVD / DEATH PENALTY
Back to the death penalty / module of the VVD.
TWO CUCKOO’S FLEW OUT OF THE NEST/MINISTER BLOK EN JOVD
Back to the death penalty / module of the VVD.
Like I wrote:
Two cuckoo’s flew out of the nest [47]
And yes, it’s true!
Between the new death penalty cult of the VVD, against IS fighters that is to say [of course, the death penalty of regimes that we do not like, we continue to have criticism / HAHAHA], hear hear, there are still two bright spots, namely at the Minister of Foreign Affairs Blok and the youth organization of the VVD, the JOVD.
Minister Blok:
First Minister Blok:
Yes, this minister has boldly expressed himself, by stating clearly, AGAINST that death penalty, even when it comes to IS fighters:
I quote Het Parool
“IS people deserve severe punishment. But I never find the death penalty acceptable, nowhere and for anyone, “said Blok on Friday.” [48]
With this Blok at least makes good of his blunders in 2018, in which he expressed himself denigrating AND incorrectly, by labeling Suriname as “Failed State” [49], nonsense debited about, according to him, successful multi-cultural societies and still expressed himself xenophobically moreover! [50]
Jovd
Not only was Minister Blok brave enough to go against the new death penalty cult of the VVD, but also the youth organization of the VVD, the JOVD, remained in principle:
In a statement, which was not to my taste further [with regard to other positions on IS fighters, but that is another story], she showed herself unequivocally against the death penalty and therefore went straight against the VVD / Lower House:
I quote:
But lateral support for the death penalty does not support the JOVD. Not now, not ever! “[51]
BEAUTIFUL!
At least some decent Voices in the VVD Family Tree!
A BIT OF PREGNANT ”?
“A punishment that we as a country, and also as a VVD, are certainly not in favor of.”
The VVD is really a huge turner!
Because Dilan Yesilgoz, with the VVD in its extension, notes on the one hand about the death penalty [see the VVD website]:
“It is a difficult point, partly because the Iraqis use the death penalty in their legal system. A punishment that we as a country, and also as a VVD, are certainly not in favor of. “[52]
And on the other hand the VVD, with her as a spokeswoman, adopts the view that if IS fighters get the death penalty in Iraq, it would be “acceptable”? [53]
Oh well, the VVD categorically categorizes that under “dilemmas …. [54]
But you cannot oppose the death penalty at the same time and find it acceptable in certain cases.
Just as little as you can’t be “a little pregnant”.
It is one or the other.
HYPOCRISION TOP DRIVEN!
WHAT a hypocrites, these ladies and gentlemen of the VVD!
Leutering about “our standards and values” and how “clear and ready” that is all [55]
Who, according to the JOVD [youth organization of the VVD] claims to fight “for human rights”
[56]
When it suits you, yes
Or if it is used as a stick to beat the immigrant [57]
But the practice is different:
Because this is the party with xenophobes and
discriminatory statements / proposals has no difficulty at all [58]
Whose Minister of Defense, Mrs Hennis Plasschaert, took steps in 2014 to strengthen military cooperation with Israel [59],
that occupation force, which not only steals the land of the Palestinians for years in the form of the continued construction of the illegal settlements [60], but has also repeatedly, and still is, guilty of war crimes and other human rights violations [61]
AND NOW THUS AS A BANG ON THE FIRE ARROW!
The Party, which has no problem with the death penalty [let’s just say, as it is], when it concerns IS fighters. [62]
OUR VALUES …………… [63]
EPILOGUE
” ” Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.
Our way of life, we just talked about homosexuality, we talk about man and woman in the Netherlands.
We are talking about our achievements, which come from humanism, from Enlightenment, that we have built up over hundreds of years. “
Thus Dutch Prime Minister Rutte [64]
  “A punishment that we as a country, and also as a VVD, are certainly not in favor of.” [65]
THE VVD HYPOCRISION IS AGAINST AGAINST:
But despite all these beautiful words:
When it comes to IS fighters, Mr. Rutte’s “cliff and clear values” and that repugnance to the death penalty suddenly disappear and then the “death penalty” suddenly IS acceptable. [66]
Against the will of the EU, EU policy and EU Treaties! [67]
Fortunately, the sudden VVD death penalty cult met with much resistance in the Lower House. [68]
Ladies and gentlemen of the VVD, It is Tweeen One
OF
You are in favor of the death penalty and you give up international treaties and EU membership and make a “kanguroo” society in the Netherlands
OF
You abide by International Law and human rights and reject the death penalty!
Even when it comes to IS fighters.
It is all or nothing.
We have no more tastes.
Astrid Essed
NOTES
[1]
WHY DO I CALL THE VVD, THE PEOPLE’S PARTY FOR DEMONIZATION?
READ WITH ME
“We feel a growing discomfort when people abuse our freedom to steal everything here, while they have just come to our country for that freedom. People who do not want to adapt, abandon our habits and reject our values. Harassing gays, cheering women in short skirts, or turning ordinary Dutch people into racists. I understand very well that people think: if you reject our country so fundamentally, I’d rather you leave. I also have that feeling. Do normal or leave. “
….
….
“In the Netherlands it is normal for you to shake hands and treat each other equally. It is normal for you to stay away from social workers. That you respect teachers and don’t freak people out with vlogs. It is normal that you work for your money and try to get the best out of your life. Each other helps when things get difficult and an arm wraps around someone in difficult times. It is normal for you to bet and not run away from problems. That you listen to each other properly. Instead of yelling at each other if you disagree with something.

The coming period will determine the course of our country. There is only one question: what kind of country do we want to be?

Let’s fight to make us feel at home in our beautiful country. Let us continue to make clear what is normal here and what is not. I’m sure we’re going to get this done. That we can sustain everything we have achieved together. You, me, all of us. Let us work together to make this country even better. Because really, we are a very cool country. I would not want to live anywhere else. Do you? ”

MARK RUTTE LETTER TO ALL DUTCHERS

https://vvd.nl/nieuws/lees-hie r-de-brief-van-mark / https://vvd.nl/content/uploads /2017/01/briefvanmark.pdf T

YOUTUBE.COM

SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTEN MARK RUTTE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mx04YMtMDZs

TEXT

Primary first feeling is:

Lazer up.

Go back to Turkey yourself.

Pleur op, I would say in flat Haags. We have the right to demonstrate in the Netherlands, they use it.

We also have freedom of the press.

These people violate this freedom of the press, they override it and perhaps let me say it more like Prime Minister:

Really cliff and ready

Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.

Our way of life, we just talked about homosexuality, we talk about man and woman in the Netherlands.

We are talking about our achievements that come from humanism, from Enlightenment, which we have built up over hundreds of years

If people come from outside – and nobody in the Netherlands is perhaps against that gentleman with that crazy program after-iser, that you receive refugees, provided that the numbers are manageable -… ..

The multicultural society, a word that I hate, really hate, the word that starts from it, lets everyone go their own way.

TO

VVD: CRIME IN PROBLEM AREAS DOUBLE SO HARD PUNISHED19 SEPTEMBER 2018

FIRST CHAMBER INITIATIVE PROPOSAL BOSMAN

LAW REGULATION ESTABLISHMENT OF DUTCH ARUBA, CURACAOEN SAINT-MAARTEN IN THE NETHERLANDS [MENTIONED IN THE VOLKSMOND “ANTILLIAN LAW”

http://www.eerekamer.nl/wetsvoorstel/33325_initiatiefvoorstel_bosman
https://www.ad.nl/politiek/vvd-criminaliteit-in-problem neighborhoods-double-zo-hard-bestraffen~a8839594/

REJECTING BOSMAN’S PROPOSAL

COTTAGE LOG

ESTABLISHMENT SCHEME FOR CARIBBEAN DUTCHERS REJECTED BY SECOND ROOM 23 NOVEMBER 2016

http://verblijfblog.nl/?p=1959

ALSO SEE

CORRESPONDING TO THE ABOVE ARTICLE: TEXT OF RACISTIC, DISCRIMINATING, ISLAMOPHYBE AND ANTISEMITICAL STATEMENTS / PROPOSALS DUTCH POLITICIANS

ASTRID ESSED

31 OCTOBER 2019

https://www.astridessed.nl/behorend-bij- above-mentioned- article- texts- racist-discriminating-islamophobic-and-antisemitic- pronunciations-proposal-netherlands-politicians/

AND

RACISM IN THE POLICY / DISTRIBUTING STATEMENTS AND PROPOSALS OF DUTCH POLITICIANS

ASTRID ESSED

NOVEMBER 1, 2019

https://www.astridessed.nl/racisme-in-de-politiek-distressing- pronunciations-and- proposals-of-nederlandse-politici/

[2]

WILDERS AND HITLER / COMPARISON CREEPY RIGHT

ASTRID ESSED

AUGUST 16, 2016

https://www.astridessed.nl/wilders-en-hitlervergelijking-griezelig-dicht/

COMPARISON WILDERS WITH HITLER / CORE OF TRUTH

ASTRID ESSED

MARCH 17, 2014

https://www.astridessed.nl/comparison-wilders-met-hitlerkern-van-waarheid/

[3]

REPUBLIC OF ALLOCHTONIA

ASTRID ESSED ABOUT A CDA / VVD CABIN WITH PVV SUPPORT

AUGUST 19, 2010

http://www.re publicallochtonie.nl/blog/opinie/astrid-essed-over-een-cda-vvd-kabinet-met-gedooghulp-pvv

[4]

”The last time a member of the cabinet used far-reaching war rhetoric was in 2004, just after the murder of Theo van Gogh. Deputy Prime Minister Gerrit Zalm (VVD) declared the country “at war with Muslim extremism.”

THE PAROOL

DOES IT HELP TO CALL THAT THE WAR IS?

NOVEMBER 16, 2015

https://www.parool.nl/nieuws/helpt-het-wel-om-te-roep-dat-het-oorlog-is~b7d4fc43/

[5]

“Before a war it was remarkably quiet on the street this morning. No soldiers, no sirens and no panic. Simply: people on their way to work, children on their way to school.

War language
We are at war, Prime Minister Mark Rutte spoke to his French colleague François Hollande on Saturday, not even 24 hours after the horrific attacks in Paris. “And Isis is our enemy.”

DOES IT HELP TO CALL THAT THE WAR IS?

NOVEMBER 16, 2015

https://www.parool.nl/nieuws/helpt-het-wel-om-te-roep-dat-het-oorlog-is~b7d4fc43/

TEXT

“Before a war it was remarkably quiet on the street this morning. No soldiers, no sirens and no panic. Simply: people on their way to work, children on their way to school.

War language
We are at war, Prime Minister Mark Rutte spoke to his French colleague François Hollande on Saturday, not even 24 hours after the horrific attacks in Paris. “And Isis is our enemy.”

How does that relate to the  call  from the Amsterdam triangle of mayor, police and the Public Prosecution Service? “Don’t allow the attacks to change our lives, so just go to a cafe, a concert, or a soccer game.””If we let our fears overcome, the terrorists win,” said Mayor Eberhard van der Laan. “Because that is their goal: that we change our lives out of fear and that there is division.”
Does it help to say that it is war? What is the superlative of that if something unexpectedly happens on Dutch territory? The “absolute war”? The Third World War?Rutte does
not dampen tension Is it not the responsibility of a prime minister to dampen emotions in times of tension instead of stirring up fear and anger? The confusion in the country is already big enough.Of course, Rutte emphasized the modest participation of the
Netherlands in the war in Iraq and Syria. And of course he also pointed out to us that the country is not at war with Islam. But with
whom then? The invisible enemy that is among us? Terrorists who
would hide in the growing stream of refugees from the Middle East?

Declaration of war
In January Paris was hit by the attack on the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. PVV leader Geert Wilders was like the chickens to declare war on the world.

In response to those words, Rutte showed himself to be a statesman, wise and impartial: “I would never use such a term.”
But now the PVV can count on a quarter of voters, 38 seats, compared to 19 for the VVD.

War is about black and white, about right and wrong. You will not win the battle for the gray center, where moderate forces meet. The last time a member of the cabinet used far-reaching war rhetoric was in 2004, just after the murder of Theo van Gogh. Deputy Prime Minister Gerrit Zalm (VVD) declared the country “at war with Muslim extremism.”

Back to top
The responses were not tender. “It suggests two nations fighting each other for life and death,” said SP leader Jan Marijnissen. And André Rouvoet of the ChristenUnie: “We must not give people the idea that anything is now possible to defeat the enemy.”

Ahmed Aboutaleb, the Amsterdam alderman who is making a furore today as mayor of Rotterdam, said: “I find it incomprehensible that a grieving nation gets these kind of words.”
Now he also speaks of war and Rutte can count on the support of the Lower House. More than ten years after Van Gogh, we are back to the question: it’s war, you go to sleep peacefully.

[6]

Primary first feeling is: Lazer on. Go back to Turkey yourself. Pleur op, I would say in flat The Hague…. ”……….
The multicultural society, a word that I hate, really hate, the word that starts from it, lets everyone go their own way ”

3.15-4.12

YOUTUBE.COM

YOUTUBE.COM

SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES

-MARK RUTTE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mx04YMtMDZs

TEXT

Primary first feeling is

: Lazer up. Go back to Turkey yourself.

Pleur op, I would say in flat Hague.

We have the right to demonstrate in the Netherlands, they use it.

We also have freedom of the press.

These people violate that freedom of the press, they trample on them and perhaps let me say it more as prime minister:

Really cliff and ready

Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.

Our way of life, we just talked about homosexuality, we talk about man and woman in the Netherlands.

We are talking about our achievements that come from humanism, from Enlightenment, which we have built up over hundreds of years

If people come from outside – and nobody in the Netherlands is perhaps the man with that crazy program after – it is against being refugees, provided that the numbers are manageable – …

The multicultural society, a word that I hate, really hate, the word that starts from it, lets everyone go their own way.

[7]”We feel a growing discomfort when people abuse our freedom to steal everything here, while they have just come to our country for that freedom. People who do not want to adapt, abandon our habits and reject our values. Harassing gays, cheering women in short skirts, or turning ordinary Dutch people into racists. I understand very well that people think: if you reject our country so fundamentally, I’d rather you leave. I also have that feeling. Do normal or leave. ”

MARK RUTTE

LETTER TO ALL DUTCHERS

https://vvd.nl/nieuws/lees-hie r-de-brief-van-mark / https://vvd.nl/content/uploads /2017/01/briefvanmark.pdf T

[8]

VVD leader Mark Rutte, as state secretary of Social Affairs, has encouraged municipalities to engage in racial discrimination. This judgment was passed by the Court of Haarlem about an appeal from Rutte.

At the beginning of 2003 he asked municipalities to check residents of Somali origin extra for fraud with assistance. A spokesperson for the Ministry of Social Affairs confirmed a message about this in the GPD newspapers on Saturday. ”

COURT: RUTTE REQUIRED DISCRIMINATION
MAY 19, 2007
[9]
FAITHFUL
VVD FIND THE DEATH PENALTY FOR DUTCH IS’ERS ACCEPTABLE
NOVEMBER 7, 2019
TEXT
The VVD finds it acceptable that Dutch IS fighters in the worst case receive the death penalty if they were tried in Iraq. This statement by Member of Parliament Dilan Yeşilgöz causes great surprise at other parties.

The Chamber debated on Wednesday late in the evening about the problems with men and women traveling to Syria. The pressure on the government to collect its own nationals there and to try them here is increasing. There is a good chance that imprisoned IS’ers escape from camps and disappear under the radar, with all the associated dangers.

For the time being, the government is refusing to repatriate Dutch IS people to the Netherlands. Foreign Minister Stef Blok would prefer that these men and women be tried in a court in Iraq. This is extremely complicated, partly because Iraq has the death penalty.

READ ALSO;  ¿Por que España?

“Ultimate consequence”

VVD MP Yeşilgöz said on Wednesday evening that the “ultimate consequence” is coming in for people who “knowingly and willingly went to the Caliphate to engage in a fight that is really aimed at destroying everything we have here in this house stand for ”. “If they then commit their terrible crimes there and the Iraqis say ‘this falls within our legal system’, then I think we should talk about it together.”

GroenLinks reacted in shock. Member of Parliament Niels van den Berge: “I think it is really unacceptable and I think we are crossing borders there in terms of human rights, international law agreements that we should not want to pass over.”

Also within the coalition the statements of the VVD are wrong. “The fact is that we have to cancel our major European and international treaties if we want to do this,” said Madeleine van Toorenburg of the CDA. According to D66 colleague Sjoerd Sjoerdsma, the VVD puts ‘a bomb’ under government policy. “If Minister Blok arrives in Saudi Arabia, in Indonesia or in other countries where people are sentenced to death, sometimes also Dutch, he can now say: we are always against the death penalty. But if we were to do what Mrs. Yeşilgöz says, then those countries would say: “Yes, hi. When it suited you, you were in favor of it. These are the laws in our country. LGBT people are illegal here. Here atheists are illegal. They are terrorists. Just walk one door further ‘. ”

Sjoerdsma turned directly to Yesilgoz in the debate: “Please withdraw that position.” But the VVD MP felt nothing for that.
[10]
France has not tried to retrieve the captured fighters with a French nationality.
WE
AGAIN TWO FRENCH WARRIORS ARE DEFINED IN IRAQ
2 JUNE 2019
[11]
WE
COALITION DIVIDED: CABINET REMAINED: NONE IS RECOVERING WARRIORS
14 OCTOBER 2019
TEXT

The government maintains that IS fighters from the Netherlands who are imprisoned in Syria will not be brought back to the Netherlands. That said Justice and Security Minister Grapperhaus after the weekly coalition meeting.

ChristenUnie and D66 insist on investigating the retrieval of fighters, as they may escape through fighting in northern Syria. But the government is not going to do that. This sharpens the division in the coalition on the issue.

According to Minister Grapperhaus it is “very unsafe” to send people in that direction and to pick up fighters.

The minister is constantly informed and has “personal confirmation” from the Red Cross that it is now “very dangerous”.

It has become completely unclear and has only become unsafe in the area.

Minister of Justice and Security Grapperhaus

The VVD is completely opposed to the recovery of fighters. The CDA also does not like it, given the chaos in the area. “We cannot send people there,” says MP Van Toorenburg.

At the break-in of the coalition meeting this morning, Christian Union leader Segers said that the impending escape of IS fighters was “a direct threat to our security and to the security of the region.” According to Segers, there is a “new situation” that needs to be looked into.

D66 MP Sjoerdsma speaks of “a tipping point” now that Turkey is attacking the area.

Day to day

D66 leader Jetten acknowledges that it is now dangerous, but calls on the government to look at the situation day by day. “Where the possibility arises, it must also be considered whether children and women can be retrieved in a European context.”

According to Grapperhaus, there are currently no reports of escaped Dutch IS fighters. When asked whether the government was not concerned that these people would still come to the Netherlands, the minister said that measures had already been taken. “The passports of Dutch travelers are invalid, they cannot legally enter our country.”

“If people end up in Turkey, the Marechaussee can pick them up there. We are in constant dialogue with our EU partners. But we are not going to a completely unsafe and confusing area to pick up these people. ”

In total, around 300 Dutch jihadists have traveled in recent years. Ninety of them died. Sixty people have returned to the Netherlands.

VRT journalist Rudi Vranckx is in northern Syria and reports  “total chaos” at the Ain Issa camp.  Especially women and children of IS fighters are detained there. Vranckx told  Nieuwsuur  that before the Turkish invasion there were 700 guards and now 60.
[12]
“France has not tried to retrieve the captured fighters with a French nationality. However, Paris says it is doing everything possible to prevent the French from actually being put to death in Iraq. “
TEXT

An Iraqi court again sentenced two Frenchmen to death for being members of terrorist group IS. One of them stated that he was tortured in captivity, but doctors who investigated him contradict that.

With these new convictions, the number of French people sentenced to death in Iraq last week is nine. Twelve French IS fighters were extradited to Iraq by the Syrian opposition in January. Three more French people are on trial tomorrow.

The Syrian Democratic Forces have also extradited more than 1100 Iraqi fighters to Baghdad, who are suspected of being affiliated with IS. Almost 160 of them have also been sentenced to death.

Bullying or torture

In Iraq, apart from the French, more IS members from Europe have been sentenced to death, but none of the European convicts has yet been executed. Of the thousands of lawsuits against people suspected of being involved in IS, hundreds are directed against non-Iraqis.

France has not tried to retrieve the captured fighters with a French nationality. Paris does say that it will do everything it can to prevent the French from actually being put to death in Iraq.

Human rights organizations criticize the large number of death sentences in Iraq. They are afraid that the processes will not proceed carefully. Convicts are often based on confessions that, according to the action groups, are enforced by intimidation or torture.

] 13]

TO

NETHERLANDS WANT WITH IRAQ IS RIGHTS FOR WARRIORS

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

https://www.ad.nl/buitenland/nederland-wil-met-irak-is-strijders-berechten~a2bcea49/

TEXT

The Netherlands wants to try IS fighters in Iraq and elsewhere in the region. Foreign minister Stef Blok is looking at the possibilities together with Iraq, sources confirm. The Hague wants to contribute legal knowledge.

Blok also wants to call on other countries to jointly develop a plan for the trial of IS fighters in the region,  NR C. reports . Because Iraq knows the death penalty, the minister does require the guarantee that it will not be applied.

Blok and his Iraqi college are organizing a meeting on Thursday at the United Nations in New York to discuss the issue. More than twenty countries have been invited. Only in Iraq are there about 20,000 imprisoned fighters of the terror movement.

[14]
”A kangaroo court is a court that ignores recognized standards of law or justice, and often carries little or no official standing in the territory within which it resides.[1] The term may also apply to a court held by a legitimate judicial authority who intentionally disregards the court’s legal or ethical obligations. The defendants in such courts are often denied access to legal representation and in some cases, proper defence and the right of appeal.”
WIKIPEDIA
KANGAROO COURT
[15]
”The judiciaries of the Iraqi government and the KRG are relying on their respective counterterrorism courts to rapidly prosecute all of these ISIS suspects on charges brought under their counterterrorism laws, primarily and often exclusively on the charge of membership in ISIS, with no distinction made for the severity of the charges brought against suspects and no effort to prioritize the prosecution of the worst offenses”
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH REPORT
FLAWED JUSTICE
ACCOUNTABILITY FOR ISIS CRIMES IN IRAQ
”Following a December 2017 Human Rights Watch report, judges in the Nineveh governorate in northern Iraq are requiring a higher evidentiary standard to detain and prosecute suspects, minimizing the court’s reliance on confessions alone, erroneous wanted lists, and unsubstantiated allegations.

“What we see in Nineveh is a significant shift in the way that prosecutions are proceeding,” said Lama Fakih, deputy Middle East and North Africa director at Human Rights Watch. “Throwing out cases with flimsy or no evidence is a step forward, but more work is needed to ensure defendants are not mistreated and get fair trials.”

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH

IRAQ: KEY COURTS IMPROVE ISIS TRIAL PROCEDURES

But changes needed in laws, response to torture, Other Courts

13 MARCH 2019

https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/03/13/iraq-key-courts-improve-isis-trial- procedures

Prosecutions of Islamic State (ISIS) suspects in Iraq are proceeding based on a deeply flawed and vague counterterrorism law, but the Nineveh governorate’s counterterrorism court has made improvements in recent months, Human Rights Watch said today.

Following a December 2017 Human Rights Watch report, judges in the Nineveh governorate in northern Iraq are requiring a higher evidentiary standard to detain and prosecute suspects, minimizing the court’s reliance on confessions alone, erroneous wanted lists, and unsubstantiated allegations.

“What we see in Nineveh is a significant shift in the way that prosecutions are proceeding,” said Lama Fakih, deputy Middle East and North Africa director at Human Rights Watch. “Throwing out cases with flimsy or no evidence is a step forward, but more work is needed to ensure defendants are not mistreated and get fair trials.”

On February 4, 2019, Human Rights Watch visited Nineveh’s counterterrorism court in Tal Kayf, north of Mosul. The head of the investigation court, Raed al-Maslah, said the court is processing the highest number of ISIS suspects in the country, with 9,000 cases in 2018. Of those, 2,036 cases were dropped; 3,162 remain under investigation; 2,827 were referred to trial, including 561 children; and 975 were transferred to other courts because the cases were not linked to terror charges. He did not have statistics on the outcomes.

Al-Maslah said that his court was taking action to improve overall respect of the rule of law. He said that in response to a Human Rights Watch report uncovering a prison the National Security Service (NSS) was illegally running in Mosul, he asked the NSS to transfer the several hundred prisoners to the Interior Ministry. However, he acknowledged they still held about 70 detainees.

In perhaps the biggest improvement in the court’s prosecutions, he said that since mid-2018, his court has been requiring a higher evidentiary standard to detain and prosecute suspects. He said that investigators have found a trove of ISIS documents that have facilitated the process, along with social media, phone, and text message data; fingerprints; and other forensic material.

In light of this new evidence, al-Maslah said he struck 7,000 names off wanted lists because they consisted of a first and last name but no other information. He said judges will only issue an arrest warrant based on evidence in ISIS documents, or on detailed and credible allegations from witnesses, including the suspect’s father and grandfather’s name. He said his court has issued 50,000 arrest warrants for people wanted for ISIS affiliation under this new standard.

Under the new procedures, anyone arrested typically appears before an investigative judge within 48 hours. If they maintain innocence, intelligence officers consult the accused’s local community leader and two neighbors to assess the credibility of the allegations. If the person is cleared, including based on witness testimony, the court issues a notice to remove the defendant’s name from wanted lists countrywide, reducing the possibility of rearrests.

Human Rights Watch sat in on a trial before the Nineveh counterterrorism court on February 4 and observed judges applying the new rules. Two lawyers that regularly appear at the court confirmed that the court’s operations had improved. “The court is more process-driven than before and as a result you are seeing fewer confession-based prosecutions, and fewer allegations of torture,” one said. “Also, with time the court has become much more sensitive to individuals using ISIS allegations as a form of personal revenge.”

There is some indication that these heightened evidentiary standards are being applied elsewhere. In a February 7 statement, the US-led coalition highlighted an increase in local police forces in Baghdad and Diyala using warrants and collecting evidence “to support investigations with the aim to prosecute offenders in a proper manner.” An international trial observer told Human Rights Watch that they had seen heightened evidentiary standards used in Karkh, one of two criminal courts in Baghdad.

However, Human Rights Watch researchers observed that in October 2018, in Baghdad’s second criminal court, Risafa, judges continue to process cases solely based on a defendant’s confession, with the defendant frequently alleging torture to extract the statement. This suggests that the heightened requirements are not being used consistently in proceedings across Iraq. Authorities should consider transferring cases from Baghdad to the Nineveh counterterrorism court if the suspect is believed to have committed their crime in Nineveh.

In addition, concerns about torture and reliance on coerced confessions remain with the lawyers saying that from their observations, the prevalence of torture, as well as deaths in custody, have continued.

In a trial of a man accused of ISIS membership that Human Rights Watch observed in early 2019, the defendant denied some charges he had confessed to and said that an officer had threatened to take him “back to Safina” to beat him again if he changed any part of his confession in court. Safina is a village south of Mosul where Human Rights Watch had documented torture allegations in abandoned houses in 2017 and has heard continued allegations of abuse. The judge ordered a medical examination after repeated requests from the defendant but did not ask for details or to show any marks on his body consistent with torture. Human Rights Watch has observed that judges routinely ignore torture allegations by defendants, and almost never investigate accused officers.

Iraq’s deeply flawed, vague counterterrorism law (no. 13/2005) remains a major concern, Human Rights Watch said. The law covers a wide variety of crimes including membership or support for a terrorist organization. While judicial authorities can issue lower sentences, the law stipulates the death penalty for anyone who committed, incited, planned, financed, or assisted in a terrorist act.

In one case before the Nineveh counterterrorism court in early January, a male nurse was prosecuted under the law because he provided ISIS members with medical care after ISIS took over the area. International humanitarian law prohibits prosecuting medical workers for performing medical duties compatible with medical ethics.

Because authorities are still not bringing any additional charges beyond the counterterrorism law against ISIS suspects, including from the penal code, authorities are not making efforts to solicit victim participation in the trials, including as witnesses.

Iraqi authorities should develop a coordinated strategy to prioritize the prosecution of those who committed the most serious crimes by bringing charges for the full range of crimes committed, and with a clear role for victims, Human Rights Watch said. Authorities should drop charges against those whose functions under ISIS helped protect human rights.

On February 24, Human Rights Watch also wrote to Muhammad Tahir al-Mulhim, director of the human rights office within the Prime Minister’s Advisory Council, Foreign Minister Mohamed Alhakim, and Interior Ministry Inspector General Jamal al-Asadi, asking whether the government had investigated Human Rights Watch allegations of ill-treatment of prisoners in an August 2018 report. Human Rights Watch also wrote to Chief Justice Faik Zaidan, asking what steps judges are obliged to take once a defendant alleges torture. None of those contacted has responded.

Iraq’s High Judicial Council should issue guidelines on the steps judges are obliged when a defendant alleges torture. Judges should investigate all credible allegations of torture and the security forces responsible, and order transfers of detainees to different facilities immediately after they allege torture or ill-treatment, to protect them from retaliation. Parliament should pass the draft Anti-Torture Law, which would require judges to order a medical examination of any detainee alleging torture within 24 hours of learning of the allegation.

Iraq’s foreign minister should urge parliament to ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture. Pending this ratification, the government should commit to setting up a National Preventative Mechanism that can inspect all detention centers in Iraq and set up effective complaint mechanisms for authorities and facilities involved in detention and interrogations. The heads of the federal intelligence agency, NSS, and the new minister of interior, once appointed, should issue statements to their chain of command on the prohibition of the use of torture and their commitment to punish perpetrators. The prime minister should publicly condemn the use of torture by all law enforcement, security and military personnel.

“The recent developments in Nineveh show that judicial authorities can better ensure that terrorism trials respect defendants’ rights.” Fakih said. “We hope to see courts elsewhere in Iraq learning from the improvements in Nineveh and introducing similar measures that can serve justice while protecting defendants from abuse.”

16]
ARTICLE 3
Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.
UNIVERSAL DECLARATION  OF HUMAN RIGHTS
[17]

” 45  That you may be the children of your Father, who is in heaven; for He makes His sun rise over the evil and the good, and rains over the just and the unjust. ”

MATTHEUS 5: 45
[18]

WIKIPEDIASCOTTSBORO BOYS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottsboro_Boys

HISTORY.COM

SCOTTSBORO BOYS

[19]
WIKIPEDIA
GUILDFORD FOUR AND MAGUIRE SEVEN
[20]
WIKIPEDIA
IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY
[21]

”Both groups’ convictions were eventually declared “unsafe and unsatisfactory”[1] and reversed in 1989 and 1991 respectively after they had served up to 15–16 years in prison.”

WIKIPEDIA

GUILDFORD FOUR AND MAGUIRE SEVEN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guildford_Four_and_Maguire_Seven

[22]
DUTCHERS GET A CLAIM FOR CIRCULATION
MARRAKESH / NO AGAINST DEATH PENALTY!
ASTRID ESSED
30 JULY 2019
MASS DEATH SENTENCES IN EGYPT/URGENT APPEAL ABOUT THE MASS DEATH SENTENCES BY THE CRIMINAL COURT IN MINYA/LETTER TO THE MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS
ASTRID ESSED
APRIL 2, 2014
THOUSANDS OF STREETS IN BANGLADESH REQUIREMENTS DEATH CRIMINAL WARS THOUGHTS / NO AGAINST DEATH PUNISHMENT
ASTRID ESSED
MARCH 1ST, 2013
DEATH PENALTY REQUIRED AGAINST MOEBARAK / BARBARS / VIOLATION RIGHT TO LE VEN
ASTRID ESSED
1 JANUARY 2012
[23]
The death penalty is the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. Amnesty opposes the death penalty in all cases without exception – regardless of who is accused, the nature or circumstances of the crime, guilt or innocence or method of execution.”
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
DEATH PENALTY
TEXT

We know that, together, we can end the death penalty everywhere.

Every day, people are executed and sentenced to death by the state as punishment for a variety of crimes – sometimes for acts that should not be criminalized. In some countries, it can be for drug-related offences, in others it is reserved for terrorism-related acts and murder.

Some countries execute people who were under 18 years old when the crime was committed, others use the death penalty against people with mental and intellectual disabilities and several others apply the death penalty after unfair trials – in clear violation of international law and standards. People can spend years on death row, not knowing when their time is up, or whether they will see their families one last time.

The death penalty is the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. Amnesty opposes the death penalty in all cases without exception – regardless of who is accused, the nature or circumstances of the crime, guilt or innocence or method of execution.

Amnesty International holds that the death penalty breaches human rights, in particular the right to life and the right to live free from torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Both rights are protected under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the UN in 1948.

Over time, the international community has adopted several instruments that ban the use of the death penalty, including the following:

• The Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty.
• Protocol No. 6 to the European Convention on Human Rights, concerning the abolition of the death penalty, and Protocol No. 13 to the European Convention on Human Rights, concerning the abolition of the death penalty in all circumstances.
• The Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights to Abolish the Death Penalty.

Although international law says that the use of the death penalty must be restricted to the the most serious crimes, meaning intentional killing, Amnesty believes that the death penalty is never the answer.

Execution Methods

• Beheading
• Electrocution
• Hanging
• Lethal injection
• Shooting

Juvenile Executions

The use of the death penalty for crimes committed by people younger than 18 is prohibited under international human rights law, yet some countries still sentence to death and execute juvenile defendants. Such executions are few compared to the total number of executions recorded by Amnesty International each year.

However, their significance goes beyond their number and calls into question the commitment of the executing states to respect international law.

Since 1990 Amnesty International has documented 145 executions of child offenders in 10 countries: China, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South Sudan, Sudan, the USA and Yemen.

Several of these countries have changed their laws to exclude the practice. Iran has executed more than twice as many child offenders as the other nine countries combined. At the time of writing Iran has executed at least 97 child offenders since 1990.

Where do most executions take place?

In 2018, most known executions took place in China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Viet Nam and Iraq – in that order.

China remains the world’s top executioner – but the true extent of the use of the death penalty in China is unknown as this data is classified as a state secret; the global figure of at least 690 recorded in 2018 excludes the thousands of executions believed to have been carried out in China.

Excluding China, 78% of all reported executions took place in just four countries – Iran, Saudi Arabia, Viet Nam and Iraq.

Executions per year

Amnesty International recorded at least 690 executions in 20 countries in 2018, down by 31% from 2017 (at least 993 executions). This figure represents the lowest number of executions that Amnesty International has recorded in the past decade.

Death sentences per year

Amnesty International recorded at least 2,531 death sentences in 54 countries in 2018, a slight decrease from the total of 2,591 reported in 2017. At least 19,336 people were known to be under sentence of death globally at the end of 2018.

Reasons to abolish the death penalty

It is irreversible and mistakes happen. Execution is the ultimate, irrevocable punishment: the risk of executing an innocent person can never be eliminated. Since 1973, for example, more than 160 prisoners sent to death row in the USA have later been exonerated or released from death row on grounds of innocence. Others have been executed despite serious doubts about their guilt.

It does not deter crime. Countries who execute commonly cite the death penalty as a way to deter people from committing crime. This claim has been repeatedly discredited, and there is no evidence that the death penalty is any more effective in reducing crime than life imprisonment.

It is often used within skewed justice systems. In many cases recorded by Amnesty International, people were executed after being convicted in grossly unfair trials, on the basis of torture-tainted evidence and with inadequate legal representation. In some countries death sentences are imposed as the mandatory punishment for certain offences, meaning that judges are not able to consider the circumstances of the crime or of the defendant before sentencing.

It is discriminatory. The weight of the death penalty is disproportionally carried by those with less advantaged socio-economic backgrounds or belonging to a racial, ethnic or religious minority. This includes having limited access to legal representation, for example, or being at greater disadvantage in their experience of the criminal justice system.

It is used as a political tool. The authorities in some countries, for example Iran and Sudan, use the death penalty to punish political opponents.

What is Amnesty doing to abolish the death penalty?

For 40 years, Amnesty has been campaigning to abolish the death penalty around the world.

Amnesty monitors its use by all states to expose and hold to account governments that continue to use the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. We publish a report annually, reporting figures and analysing trends for each country. Amnesty’s latest report, Death Sentences and Executions 2018, was released in April 2019.

The organisation’s work to oppose the death penalty takes many forms, including targeted, advocacy and campaign based projects in the Africa, Asia-Pacific, Americas and Europe and Central Asia region; strengthening national and international standards against its use, including by supporting the successful adoption of resolutions on a moratorium on the use of the death penalty by the UN General Assembly; and applying pressure on cases that face imminent execution. We also support actions and work by the abolitionist movement, at national, regional and global level.

When Amnesty started its work in 1977, only 16 countries had totally abolished the death penalty. Today, that number has risen to 106 – more than half the world’s countries. More than two-thirds are abolitionist in law or practice.

[24]

The cornerstone of human rights is respect for the inherent dignity of all human beings and the inviolability of the human person. Human Rights Watch opposes capital punishment in all countries and in all circumstances because the inherent dignity of the person is inconsistent with the death penalty. This form of punishment is unique in its cruelty and finality, and it is inevitably and universally plagued with arbitrariness, prejudice, and error.”

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH

US: AN ATTACK ON HUMAN DIGNITY

STATEMENT ON WORLD DAY AGAINST THEDEATH PENALTY

10 OCTOBER 2011

https://www.hrw.org/news/2011/10/10/us-attack-human-dignity

TEXT

The cornerstone of human rights is respect for the inherent dignity of all human beings and the inviolability of the human person. Human Rights Watch opposes capital punishment in all countries and in all circumstances because the inherent dignity of the person is inconsistent with the death penalty. This form of punishment is unique in its cruelty and finality, and it is inevitably and universally plagued with arbitrariness, prejudice, and error.

October 10, 2011 is the ninth annual World Day against the Death Penalty, and this year marks 35 years since the United States reinstated capital punishment in 1976. In that time, 1,271 people have been electrocuted, shot, hanged, gassed, or put to death by lethal injection. In September, the state of Georgia executed Troy Davis despite significant doubts about his guilt. Texas executed its 475th prisoner since 1976. During that time, Texas has by far executed the largest number of people of any US state.

Those responsible for serious crimes should be fairly and appropriately brought to justice, and the victims of crimes and their families should have access to the mechanisms of justice and redress. But it is increasingly recognized around the world that the death penalty is a fundamental assault on the right to life found in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and international human rights treaties.

Innocent people have been sentenced to death in the United States. Since 1973, 138 prisoners have been released from death rows around the country after they were shown to be innocent of the crimes for which they had been sentenced to die. Some of them were released just days before they were scheduled for execution. The inherent fallibility of all criminal justice systems assures that even when full due process of law is respected, innocent people are likely to be executed. Because an execution is irreversible, such miscarriages of justice can never be corrected.

Race, poverty, and geography are inexorably intertwined with the death penalty. Defendants whose victims were white are more likely to be sentenced to death than those whose victims were members of a minority group. Poor defendants are generally represented by government-appointed counsel, who are often overworked and underpaid for the weighty responsibility of defending a person faced with the possibility of execution. Prosecutors in certain counties are more likely to seek the death penalty than those elsewhere in the same state. The accident of geography, and no other aspect of a particular crime, can mean the difference between life and death for the defendant.

The United States stands increasingly alone among democratic countries in its continued use of the death penalty. By retaining capital punishment in a world that has largely turned its back on this barbaric practice, the US damages its reputation, causes friction with its closest neighbors and allies, and undermines its efforts to promote human rights at home and abroad.

For all of these reasons, the death penalty is becoming increasingly rare in the United States. The numbers of executions and death sentences per year have decreased by half in the last 10 years. Four states have abolished the death penalty in the past four years, raising the total number of states prohibiting capital punishment to 16, plus the District of Columbia. Death as a punishment is becoming more and more unusual because it is increasingly recognized as inherently cruel.

Human Rights Watch urges all jurisdictions in the United States to reject the death penalty, and in doing so, to reaffirm fundamental principles of human rights.

[25]
FAITHFUL
VVD FIND THE DEATH PENALTY FOR DUTCH IS’ERS ACCEPTABLE
NOVEMBER 7, 2019
‘A kangaroo court is a court that ignores recognized standards of law or justice, and often carries little or no official standing in the territory within which it resides.[1] The term may also apply to a court held by a legitimate judicial authority who intentionally disregards the court’s legal or ethical obligations. The defendants in such courts are often denied access to legal representation and in some cases, proper defence and the right of appeal.”
WIKIPEDIA
KANGAROO COURT
”The judiciaries of the Iraqi government and the KRG are relying on their respective counterterrorism courts to rapidly prosecute all of these ISIS suspects on charges brought under their counterterrorism laws, primarily and often exclusively on the charge of membership in ISIS, with no distinction made for the severity of the charges brought against suspects and no effort to prioritize the prosecution of the worst offenses”
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH REPORT
FLAWED JUSTICE
ACCOUNTABILITY FOR ISIS CRIMES IN IRAQ
[26]
“Article 2 Right to life 1. Everyone has the right to life. 2. No one is sentenced to death or executed. “
CHARTER OF FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION
[27]
‘“Capital punishment is inhumane and unnecessary. Experience has also shown that it does not serve as a deterrent to crime. No legal system is flawless; any miscarriage of justice could lead to the tragic loss of an innocent life. ”
EUROPEAN UNION
JOINT DECLARATION  BY TJORBJORN JAGLAND, SECRETARY GENERAL OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE AND CATHERINE ASHTON, EUROPEAN UNION HIGH REPRESENTATIVE FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND SECURITY POLICY, ON THE EUROPEAN AND WORLD DAY AGAINST THE DEATH PENALTY, 10 OCTOBER 2012
[28]
“The EU is the largest sponsor in the fight against the death penalty worldwide. All EU countries have abolished the death penalty in accordance with the  European Convention on Human Rights . “
NEWS
EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT
PUNCTION: IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT THE SITUATION IN EUROPE AND THE REST OF THE WORLD
12 MARCH 2019
[29]
Really clear and readyOur achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model
 SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES
MARK RUTTE
[30]
Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.
 SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES
MARK RUTTE
[31]
[31]
“The term  nexit  refers to a hypothetical scenario in which the  Netherlands  would leave  the  European Union . The word is a  porte-manteau  of ‘the Netherlands’ and ‘exit’
WIKIPEDIA
nexium
[32]
NRC
VVD ROOM MEMBER: RETURN TO CHILDREN WITHOUT PARENTS
15 OCTOBER 2019
TEXT
The statements of Dilan Yesilgöz do not mean, according to spokesperson, that the VVD position not to bring anyone back from Syria will change.

If it is possible for young children of Dutch IS fighters to be returned from Syria without their parents, this should be negotiable according to VVD MP Dilan Yesilgöz. She said so on Monday evening in the TV program  Pauw . A spokesperson for the VVD said that the party’s position that no one would be recalled from Syria and perpetrators in the region would not change.

READ ALSO;  Hoe het VK de controle terug kan krijgen - en een goede deal kan krijgen met Brussel

If it is possible to bring “very small children” without their parents to the Netherlands, Yesilgöz says: “You can talk about that because they can’t do anything about it either.” . Yesilgöz does not discuss specific conditions under which this should be possible. Divorcing children and their parents is out of the question because it goes against international law.

Coalition divided

The coalition is divided  over the recovery of Dutch IS fighters and their children from Syria. Earlier, D66 argued for the controlled return of IS people and Christian Union, which is open to the recovery of IS women and children, believes that “you cannot continue to give the old answers in new circumstances,” said MP Joël Voordewind (CU). CDA and VVD maintain the view that return is not open to discussion.
[33]

ACCORDING TO INTERNATIONAL LAW, DIVORCE OF CHILDREN FROM THEIR PARENTS IS NOT ALLOWED

” 1. States Parties shall ensure that a child shall not be separated from his or her parents against their will, except when competent authorities subject to judicial review determine, in accordance with applicable law and procedures, that such separation is necessary for the best interests of the child. Such determination may be necessary in a particular case such as one involving abuse or neglect of the child by the parents, or one where the parents are living separately and a decision must be made as to the child’s place of residence. ”
ARTICLE 9
CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD
She says she is referring to children aged five or six. Yesilgöz does not discuss specific conditions under which this should be possible. Divorcing children and their parents is out of the question because it goes against international law. “
NRC
VVD ROOM MEMBER: RETURN TO CHILDREN WITHOUT PARENTS
15 OCTOBER 2019
[34]
[34]
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
SYRIA: DIRE CONDITIONS FOR ISIS SUSPECT’S FAMILIES
JULY 23, 2019
TEXT

(Al-Hol, Northeast Syria) – The Kurdish-led Autonomous Administration for northeast Syria is holding more than 11,000 foreign women and children related to Islamic State (also known as ISIS) suspects in appalling and sometimes deadly conditions in a locked desert camp in northeast Syria, Human Rights Watch said today. At least 7,000 of the children are under 12.

During three visits to the section of al-Hol camp holding foreign women and children in June 2019, Human Rights Watch found overflowing latrines, sewage trickling into tattered tents, and residents drinking wash water from tanks containing worms. Young children with skin rashes, emaciated limbs, and swollen bellies sifted through mounds of stinking garbage under a scorching sun or lay limp on tent floors, their bodies dusted with dirt and flies. Children are dying from acute diarrhea and flu-like infections, aid groups and camp managers said.

“Foreign women and children are indefinitely locked in a dustbowl inferno in northeast Syria while their home countries look the other way,” said Letta Tayler, senior terrorism and counterterrorism researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Governments should be doing what they can to protect their citizens, not abandon them to disease and death in a foreign desert.”

At least 240 children have died en route or upon arrival to al-Hol, according to the United Nations. Authorities from the camp, which is overseen by the Autonomous Administration, do not appear to consistently record deaths, international aid group members said. The groups did not want to be identified for fear of losing access to al-Hol.

Al-Hol guards do not allow the women and children to leave the camp except when escorted out for emergencies such as surgery not available in camp hospitals.

Officials from the Autonomous Administration told Human Rights Watch they do not intend to prosecute the women and children. Asked about the legal status of the women and children, they said only in a brief written statement that when the women and children left ISIS-held areas, they were “transferred to al-Hol to work on delivering them to their countries given that they are from different nationalities.” The Autonomous Administration has repeatedly called on home countries to take back all foreigners in their custody. “We are overwhelmed,” a camp manager said.

Countries should immediately assist efforts of their citizens held in al-Hol camp to come home if they choose to do so. The Autonomous Administration, as well as home countries, should ensure that detention is only imposed according to law, on an individual basis, and with all basic rights of detainees under international law including judicial review of detention.

Donor governments, the United Nations, and humanitarian agencies should also immediately increase aid to all camp inhabitants, more than 7,000 of them children.

From June 21 to 23, Human Rights Watch interviewed 26 foreign women confined in al-Hol annex from countries including Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, the Netherlands, and Trinidad. The women included mothers who begged camp guards for news of husbands or sons whom US-backed, Kurdish-led troops, called the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), had separated from them when they fled ISIS-held areas over the past several months.

“Please, tell me, where are my sons? Please, let me visit them,” pleaded “Aisha,” a pregnant woman from Trinidad. The SDF took her two sons, ages 14 and 15, and their father when the family fled ISIS-held Abu Badran in January, she said.

“First they said they would bring my boys to me in a month. Then they said two more weeks. Then they said they were sick in the hospital,” Aisha said of camp officials. Like other women interviewed, Aisha did not want her real name used. “Then for the past two months, nothing.”

Conditions are dire throughout al-Hol, which holds 62,000 Syrians and Iraqis in the main camp sections, most of them also wives and children of men accused of ISIS membership. However, the worst conditions are in the annex holding the 11,000 non-Iraqi foreigners. The annex receives less aid from donors and annex inhabitants must wait for armed escorts to bring them to the camp market, hospitals, and food distribution center, which Syrian and Iraqi women and children can reach freely, aid workers said.

All but one of the foreign women interviewed by Human Rights Watch said they wanted to go home. One, from Uzbekistan, said she wanted to go to a third country because she feared persecution if repatriated. All said they are not allowed to leave the locked camp. None said she had been taken before a judge to review whether she should be detained or been contacted by a representative of her government.

“We were prisoners under al-Dawla [ISIS] and now we’re prisoners of our liberators,” said “Layla,” a 29-year-old Frenchwoman. “I’ll go to prison again back home if I have to but please, just get me out of here.”

International law allows imposing punishment for crimes only on people responsible for the crimes, after a fair trial to determine individual guilt. Imposing collective punishment on families by preventing them from leaving the camps violates the laws of war.

Unless they are lawful places of detention such as prisons, camps for displaced people should respect the free movement right to leave the camps and return. Movement restrictions are only permissible if they are provided by law and necessary to protect national security, public order, public health or morals, or the rights and freedoms of others. Any restrictions must be nondiscriminatory, proportionate, and necessary to achieve legitimate aims.

Anyone detained, including civilians initially detained in wartime as security threats, should be detained on a clear legal basis, and have the right to challenge the necessity and legality of their captivity before a court. No one should be detained in inhuman or degrading conditions. International law obligates all countries to ensure justice through fair trials for the gravest crimes, such as those by ISIS.

International law also grants everyone the right to return to their home country and obligates countries to fulfill a child’s right to acquire a nationality. This duty has been interpreted to extend to children born abroad to a country’s citizens who would otherwise be stateless.

“The conditions in al-Hol annex are untenable and unconscionable,” Tayler said. “Abandoning citizens to indefinite confinement without charge will only make the problem worse.”

More than 7,000 foreign children and 3,000 foreign women from about 50 countries are held in the al-Hol annex according to officials from the Autonomous Administration, which is led by the Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD). Several hundred more foreigners are held in two other camps in northeast Syria, Ain Issa, and Roj. In addition to Westerners, the foreigners include Algerians, Indonesians, Malaysians, Moroccans, Russians, Tunisians, Turks, and Uzbeks, among others. About two-thirds of the foreign children are under age 12 – with most under age 5 – and hundreds are orphans, their parents missing or dead, aid workers said. While most women and children are recent arrivals, some said they had been held at Al-Hol for over a year.

Reluctant Donors, Insufficient Access

Autonomous Administration authorities blamed the conditions in al-Hol annex on insufficient aid from foreign donors. “We feel abandoned by the international community,” Abdulkarim Omar, the administration’s co-chair for foreign affairs, told Human Rights Watch. “Taking care of these foreigners is a big, big problem for us. Countries should take back their people and rehabilitate them.”

The Autonomous Administration and SDF have already made significant sacrifices as part of the international coalition fighting ISIS, Omar said. About 12,000 SDF troops were killed and another 20,000 were injured fighting ISIS, he said, in part “so that people in Europe can sleep calmly at night.”

About three dozen aid agencies including the UN Refugee Agency and UNICEF work in al-Hol. But many donor countries are wary of supporting a camp population that may include ISIS members or sympathizers, Autonomous Administration authorities and humanitarian workers said, even though the majority of people in the camp are young children who had no choice but to live with their parents under ISIS.

“We are seeing the stigmatization of a vast section of the camp population that is perceived as affiliated with the Islamic State group,” said Fabrizio Carboni, who heads Near and Middle East operations for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Carboni warned against a “good victim-bad victim” double standard. International standards prohibit denying essential aid, including if the denial is based on ideological or religious affiliation.

Some organizations are also concerned that their assistance could enable indefinite detention of women and children without charge. “It is one thing to assist a refugee camp and another to assist a prison,” one aid worker said.

The three field hospitals in the main camp areas are understaffed and under-resourced, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported in July. Doctors Without Borders runs a health clinic inside the annex and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) runs a mobile clinic there, but their hours are limited due to staff shortages and security concerns.

Two-fold access problems also hinder delivery of services, aid groups said. Humanitarian agencies with agreements to work in Syria must obtain permission to access al-Hol through Damascus because the Autonomous Administration controlling the northern third of Syria, including al-Hol camp, is not an internationally recognized government. Negotiations with the Syrian government on humanitarian access are often difficult, as Human Rights Watch documented in a June report.

But even agencies that receive Syrian government permission, or that work under the radar in al-Hol without it, sometimes face delays in obtaining the Autonomous Administration authorities’ permission to deliver assistance inside the annex, aid workers said. In its July report, OCHA said that humanitarian access to the annex “remains restricted” in ways that “continue to impact and prevent delivery of services.”

Say Health Conditions

One reason for poor conditions at al-Hol is that the camp population soared from 10,000 people in December 2018 to more than 73,000 by April, camp managers and aid groups said. During that period, a US-led military coalition routed ISIS from its last stand in Baghouz, a town in eastern Deir al-Zour governate. Many new arrivals from Deir al-Zour were severely injured, traumatized, and malnourished. Yet while conditions are dire throughout al-Hol, they are worse in the annex than in the main areas where Syrians and Iraqis are confined, camp officials and aid workers said.

During Human Rights Watch visits, al-Hol annex was filled with the sounds of children wailing and women and children coughing. A funnel-shaped dust whirl blew hot dust and debris into tents.

Many women and children had visible skin sores from leishmaniasis, a sand fly-borne parasite. Some inhabitants have been diagnosed with tuberculosis, camp managers said. Drinking water is insufficiently chlorinated and remains in short supply, aid workers said. Human Rights Watch saw children drink water from a wash-water tank that had worms coming out of the spout.

In July, OCHA reported a “sharp increase” in acute diarrhea and a “slight increase” in acute malnutrition throughout al-Hol.

Some women, including those with risky pregnancies and pre-natal complications such as anemia or high blood pressure, are giving birth in their tents without a doctor or midwife, aid workers said. One reason is that Asayish – Autonomous Administration security agents who guard the camp –sometimes delay or refuse their requests to go to a hospital, or they arrive at a hospital only to be turned away because the facility is full, they said. In an added disadvantage, women who give birth in a hospital automatically receive post-natal care and essentials such as diapers whereas women who give birth in tents must request such assistance, they said.

Three women said that a young girl had died from kidney failure in the annex the previous week.

Human Rights Watch saw several wounded children in the annex. One was a bone-thin, 12-year-old Russian boy wearing a patch over his left eye. “Shrapnel in Baghouz,” he said, adding that he had lost vision in that eye.

Another boy, a 4-year-old from Uzbekistan, sat with a blank stare as his mother pushed him across the rubble in a stroller, his right leg missing up to his mid-thigh. The boy’s leg was blown off during a US-led coalition strike in the Syrian town of Sousa in late 2018, his mother said, adding: “I have been trying to get him crutches and a prosthetic leg for four months.”

Worse Conditions for Foreigners

In addition to problems accessing essential services in the main camp areas, nearly all the women interviewed in the annex said they had scant if any means to buy fresh food for their children to supplement their rations of lentils, grains, oil, and sugar, or extra diapers. SDF troops and Asayish agents have confiscated women’s cash and other valuables and barred them from selling any possessions that they may have been able to hold onto, camp inhabitants and aid workers said.

Camp administrators allow Syrian and Iraqi women in the main camp areas to make purchases through the Hawala alternative money transfer system but the foreigners cannot, aid workers said.

Autonomous Administration authorities also bar women in the annex from using cell phones for fear they may contact ISIS members, although cell phones are allowed in sections holding Syrians and Iraqis, aid workers said. The ICRC has begun helping women send letters to family members, but many have not yet made contact and communications have been irregular for those who have.

On all three visits Human Rights Watch saw dozens of women pounding on the chain-link fence that cordons off the annex, clamoring for escorts to reach supplies or health services. Human Rights Watch saw some of the women waiting for hours, with no shade, in 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit) heat. The temperature at al-Hol has soared as high as 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit) this summer.

“I am going into labor,” shouted a visibly pregnant woman. “What about our human rights?” demanded another. By the time they reach the food distribution point, the rations are sometimes gone and they have to return the next day, the women said.

Living in Fear

Tensions run high in al-Hol, and many women said they were terrified for their safety and that of their children. Women in the camp who adhere to ISIS’ extremist ideology have threatened and set fire to tents of women and children who they consider infidels. Twice, in separate attacks in June and July, a woman stabbed a guard with a knife hidden in her abaya, camp managers and aid workers said.

Guards raid tents at night and frequently shoot in the air to keep order. On July 3, guards shot and wounded two boys, ages 12 and 10, who they said were throwing rocks at them, aid workers said. Twice while at the camp in June, Human Rights Watch heard gunshots fired.

Interviewees also consistently said they feared the Asayish security agents who frequently search tents and take away families in the middle of the night. Camp managers said that the night raids were necessary to remove women or children who were security threats, or to relocate families who feared for their safety to other areas of al-Hol or other camps.

Many women said they also feared tent fires caused by women cooking inside tents; at least one child died in a cooking fire. Others spoke of insects and snakes that crawl onto their sleeping pallets at night.

Piecemeal Repatriations

Repatriations of ISIS suspects and family members from northeast Syria, as well as from neighboring Iraq, have been piecemeal. KazakhstanUzbekistanTajikistanRussiaKosovo, and Turkey have organized the return home of more than 1,250 nationals held in northeast Syria and Iraq, most of them children.

But most countries have ignored the Autonomous Administration’s calls for them to repatriate citizens or have taken back only small numbers, primarily orphans, calling them a security threat and citing complications in verifying citizenship of children lacking documents or born in areas under ISIS control.

Norway in June repatriated 5 orphans from northeast Syria. France in March and June flew home 18 children – 17 from northeast Syria and 1 from Iraq. In June, Sweden brought home 7 children and the Netherlands brought home 2 children from Syria. Germany has flown home fewer than 10 from Iraq. Australia in June brought home 8 children from Syria. The US, which has criticized Western allies for refusing to repatriate all its nationals, has brought home 16 adult suspects and children since July 2018. Italy in June took back one suspected ISIS fighter.

France has allowed 11 citizens to be prosecuted in Iraq although the defendants were sentenced to death in rushed proceedings tainted by allegations of torture. The UK has stripped citizenship from nationals including Shamima Begum, who joined ISIS abroad, and Denmark in March proposed stripping children of ISIS members of citizenship. Australia in July introduced draconian revisions to Australian law that would ban returns of citizens as young as 14 for two years if they are suspected of being foreign fighters abroad.

Expressions of Regret

All the women interviewed said they realized soon after arriving in Syria that they had made a mistake. They all insisted that during their life under ISIS their roles had been solely those of housewives and mothers. Human Rights Watch is not in a position to judge the veracity of these claims and it is clear that some women in the camp support – and seek to enforce – ISIS ideology. Women who have committed international crimes should be charged and those who do not face criminal charges should be freed. But children brought to or born in ISIS-controlled areas should not be punished for their parents’ poor judgment or crimes.

“My children did not choose this life,” said “Fatima,” a 27-year-old Belgian widow held in al-Hol with her four young children. Fatima said her 7-year-old daughter did not even learn to read and write under ISIS. Her 6-year-old daughter has a viral infection; unable to obtain medical care in the annex, she scrounged funds to buy rehydrating fluids and inserted an intravenous drip in her daughter’s arm with a friend.

“My children don’t even have a working toilet,” Fatima said. “When there is shooting, they cry and remember the fighting. They deserve a second chance.”

Additional Recommendations

As part of measures to assist repatriation efforts, countries should immediately take all possible steps to ensure that their citizens trapped in any areas of al-Hol or in other camps or prisons in northeast Syria have a way to request repatriation and expedite efforts to verify citizenship, particularly of children. Countries that can guarantee fair trials and humane conditions should investigate and, if appropriate, prosecute returnees responsible for international crimes such as war crimes and torture.

Children should be treated first and foremost as victims, including those recruited by ISIS, and decisions about their future should be made based on their best interests. Parents should be brought home with children unless separation is in the child’s best interest. Children should face prosecution only in exceptional circumstances.

In the meantime, Autonomous Administration camp administrators, humanitarian organizations and donor governments, including those with nationals confined to camps in northeast Syria, should improve sanitary conditions, access to food and clean water, shelter, and medical and psychosocial services for all camp inhabitants. The Autonomous Administration should increase annex inhabitants’ access to essential services in other camp areas.

The Autonomous Administration and US-led coalition fighting ISIS should facilitate contact between camp inhabitants and their families including relatives held in separate prisons or camps.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres should press and assist UN agencies including the UN Refugees Agency and member states to coordinate a swift global response that upholds international human rights protections and includes repatriations and resettlements.

Statements from Women Confined in al-Hol annex

This is a nightmare I cannot wake up from. As Muslims we wanted to experience the Islamic State like Christians want to visit Jerusalem. It was so easy to get to Syria through Turkey. But then we found there was no way out. Bombs were falling everywhere and we could not afford a smuggler. In the end they [ISIS] even hid food from us. The only people they fed were their fighters. We are so broken. We are not threats to anyone. We just want our children to go to school and to stop stressing about where is the next meal coming from.

  • “Ayisha,” 37 weeks pregnant, from Trinidad. Mother of five children including two boys, ages 14 and 15, who were taken with her husband when the family surrendered to SDF forces in January.

From the first day I got to Syria I wanted to go home. They [ISIS] treated us like garbage. There was so much injustice. But my husband kept saying, “Forget going back. If they know we want to leave they will put us in prison or kill us.” Then my husband died two years ago. He just never came home. Since then I have been trying to find a way home. The Prophet…says the Sham [Levant] is a blessed place. But I never saw a blessing.

  • “Maria” from Belgium, widow, mother of two children born in Syria.

One day my husband said, “I am going, you are coming with me.” I was thinking, “Why? We are comfortable.” But as a Muslim woman you follow your husband. I just want to go back to Australia. My family says they will take me and the children back. People think we are monsters. Please tell them we are humans, just like them.

  • “Radhia” from Australia, widow, mother of three children born in Syria.

I thought, “Now I’ll be able to practice my religion and cover my face without being harassed the way I am at home.” I heard there was bombing and stuff but I didn’t think I’d be living under it. But then I got here [to Syria] and realized how dangerous it was. My husband became disillusioned, too. A year ago, we found a smuggler to take us out. We wanted to start over. But then Kurdish [SDF] forces took us.

  • “Miriam” from Canada, mother of two children born in Syria, husband in SDF-controlled prison.

I came to Syria because I was having problems at work and at home. It sounds so cliché. I was 20 when I left. I got the idea while I was conversing online with sisters [ISIS members]. I married two weeks after I arrived. They gave me a paper with three men’s names, ages, and hometowns. I chose the man from my hometown. We met and we liked each other. Then he was killed by a bullet in the head. If I have to go to prison I will. I just want to come home.

  • “Hanneke” from the Netherlands, widow.
[35]
” SYRIA: DIRE CONDITIONS FOR ISIS SUSPECT’S FAMILIES
Countries should support citizen’s return, Increase Aid”
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
SYRIA: DIRE CONDITIONS FOR ISIS SUSPECT’S FAMILIES
JULY 23, 2019
[36]
WE
JUDGMENT: THE NETHERLANDS SHOULD MAKE A DIFFICULTY TO RECOVER IS CHILDREN
TEXT

The Netherlands must make an effort to collect 56 IS children from detention camps in northeastern Syria as quickly as possible. The judge ruled that in summary  proceedings  that their 23 mothers had filed.

According to the judge, the children in the overcrowded camps al-Roj and al-Hol live in an acute emergency situation, without their own choosing. That is why Dutch policy not to actively bring the children back must change.

Their mothers are not entitled to repatriation because, according to the judge, they have chosen to travel to IS territory. However, the court takes into account that the local authorities only allow the children to go with their mothers. In that case, the Netherlands must also recover the mothers, the judge says.

In the ruling, the judge emphasizes that this is an obligation on the part of the state. According to him, the Netherlands cannot be forced into something that it cannot do. The judge does say that the government must make use of American help with repatriation and the willingness of the Syrian Kurds to let the children, and possibly their mothers, leave the camps.

Partially their way

According to reporter Mattijs van de Wiel, the mothers have partly got their way. “The judge agrees with the lawyers that the state is responsible for the children, and the government must make efforts for their return. But there is no stick behind the door, no penalty, and the judge will soon not be checking what the state is doing with this ruling. ”

André Seebregts, one of the mother’s lawyers, is satisfied with the ruling. He says that the Netherlands will indeed do its best. “That means that if the Kurds are asked to let them go, they will probably say yes, just like the Americans. So under those circumstances, it seems that it will lead to the result that we want. ”

The Dutch State does not want to pick up the mothers and children so far, because the women have traveled to IS territory of their own free will. “They have thus contributed to the functioning of IS and brought their children into a very violent environment,” state lawyer Reimer Veldhuis told the judge a week and a half ago. The Netherlands also finds a recall campaign too dangerous.
[37]
“” I hope the Dutch state will continue to sue, “says VVD MP Yesilgöz. “We do not want these children back. And certainly not their parents. “
WE
ROOM ALSO AFTER OPINION JUST DIVIDED OVER RECOVERY IS CHILDREN
TEXT

In the House of Representatives, there is a different reaction to the decision of the judge in  the case  that 23 IS mothers had brought. This once again shows the political division about the collection of mothers and children from the IS area.

VVD and CDA believe that there are risks attached to the decision. If children of IS people come to the Netherlands, the parents have the right to family reunification with all the dangers that that entails, the parties say.

“I hope the Dutch state will continue to sue,” says VVD MP Yesilgöz. “We do not want these children back. And certainly not their parents. ”

The CDA considers the crimes that these women co-committed weigh heavily. The women have lost their right to help, says CDA MP Van Toorenburg. “I think we should focus our efforts on the victims of the genocide.”

“Humanity”

The other two government parties, D66 and ChristenUnie, are less opposed to the return of IS women and their children. D66 supports the more active recovery of IS children. The party believes that is necessary from the point of view of “fellow humanity,” says D66 MP Sjoerdsma. “Those children are now growing up in detention camps, in a mini-caliphate between barbed wire.”

The ChristenUnie also sees that problem. “This statement clearly shows the dilemma between the situation of the children who were taken to this area and the mothers who chose it themselves,” says MP Van der Graaf. D66 and ChristenUnie think it is a risk to have the children radicalized there, while they may one day come back to the Netherlands.

According to  the court’s decision  , the Netherlands must endeavor to have the children return. But the State does not have to take unreasonable risks, for example by putting the lives of soldiers at risk. The cabinet is studying the ruling.

[38]

ELSEVIER

CHILDREN OMBUDSMAN WANTS CHILDREN BACK / SAVINGS DOES STATE

https://www.elsevierweekblad.nl/netherlands/background/2019/01/kinderombudsman-en-zegveld-trek-weer-ten-strijde-tegen-kabinet-665618/

TEXT

Shortly after a ruling requiring the Belgian state to take ‘caliphate children’ and their parents back from Syria, Children’s Ombudsman Margrite Kalverboer once again calls on the Dutch government to do the same with children of Dutch IS fighters. At the same time, lawyer Liesbeth Zegveld is suing the Dutch state for a bombing in Iraq.

I am concerned about the physical and emotional safety and developmental prospects of the children, “Kalverboer writes Tuesday in a letter to the Minister of Justice and Security Ferdinand Grapperhaus (CDA). The Ombudsman for Children also fears that Dutch society will be at risk if the children return ‘after an increasingly long stay under depressing circumstances’. That is why, in her opinion, the minister must make every effort to return the approximately 145 children with at least one Dutch parent who currently reside in Kurdish camps in northern Syria. The  Ombudsman for Children made such a call in April .

Kalverboer, who warns that the conditions in the camps are deteriorating in the winter, wants the cabinet to ‘take care of the emotional and physical safety of the children (…) and their right to development’. She responds to a letter that Grapperhaus sent to the Lower House a month ago. In it, the CDA minister clarifies that the  cabinet is not ‘actively committed’  to the recovery of Syrians and their children.

First of all, Grapperhaus points   out the personal responsibility of the adults who have traveled to the IS area. They “knowingly made the choice to join a terrorist group.” With that they have “put the children they brought with them or those born there” in serious danger. In addition, according to the government, the international Convention on the Rights of the Child does not imply any obligation to collect the  caliphate children  . The minister also fears that terrorist suspects will be arrested and tried by local authorities when they go to a consulate in the region. “It is not inconceivable that the death penalty will be imposed,” writes Grapperhaus.

READ ALSO;  France: the pent-up anger

Kalverboer also believes that primary responsibility lies with the parents who left for the caliphate, but she states that their children had no choice and should therefore not be the victims of the decision of their parents. Moreover, she believes that according to the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Dutch state does indeed have an obligation to ‘guarantee the development interests of children’, namely if parents fail to protect them.

The Ombudsman for Children refers to a court  ruling in Belgium , a week and a half ago. There, an interlocutory judge ruled on the basis of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that within forty days the Belgian government would have to recover six children and their mothers – two women who deliberately chose to live in IS territory – from Kurdish Al-Hol camp. According to Adriana van Dooijeweert, president of the Netherlands Institute for Human Rights, it is not inconceivable that this ruling will set  a precedent for the Netherlands . A College spokesperson said to Elsevier Weekblad two weeks ago : “I can at least imagine lawyers going to court to give it a try. The European Convention on Human Rights also applies here. ”

Zegveld takes the Dutch state to court for the bombing of Iraq

Today it was also announced that lawyer Liesbeth Zegveld will start a lawsuit against the Dutch state. She assists Iraqi student Mohammed Ahmed, whose mother died on 26 January 2015 during a bombing of the Western coalition on a convoy of taxis in the city of Mosul, which was occupied by IS. Ahmed, who was in the taxi with his mother to escape from the city, was wounded himself.

Because Zegveld does not know whether the Dutch air force was also involved in this bombing, she wants to know which countries were responsible for it that day,  she says to the  AD : “My client has nothing against the role of the coalition in the war his country, but then the coalition must take its responsibility. ”

Zegveld, who works for the left-wing and activist ‘human rights office’ Prakken d’Oliveira (see box on the right), is known for the many lawsuits that she instigates against the Dutch state. For example, she assisted the relatives of the Moluccan hijackers who were shot during the  train hijacking at De Punt  (1977), in which she was wrong. She has also sued Defense for the role that Dutch soldiers played in Srebrenica (1995), the Dutch East Indies (1947) and the Chora Valley in Afghanistan (2007). Zegveld demands compensation for the bereaved of civilian deaths caused by Dutch soldiers.

Her colleagues from the Prakken d’Oliveira office are also regularly involved in cases against the Dutch government. Three weeks ago, the law firm announced that its lawyers Tom de Boer and Tamara Buruma assist ‘ haatimam ‘ Fawad Jneiz, who filed a  complaint against the Netherlands  before the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR).

Minister Grapperhaus imposed an area ban on two neighborhoods in The Hague, Schilderswijk and Transvaal for a period of six months on Fawaz Jneid. This is because the imam in his lectures would encourage young people to use jihadist violence. The  imam challenged the area ban , but both the Hague court and the Council of State rejected his appeal. He still hopes to be right through the ECHR.

[39]
” SYRIA: DIRE CONDITIONS FOR ISIS SUSPECT’S FAMILIES
Countries should support citizen’s return, Increase Aid”
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
SYRIA: DIRE CONDITIONS FOR ISIS SUSPECT’S FAMILIES
JULY 23, 2019
[40]

”FROM VARIOUS SOURCES, IT CAN BE CREATED THAT CHILDREN MAKE THEM WITH BOMBARDEMENTS, SEXUAL ABUSE, TORTURE, ABSENCE OF EDUCATION, CHILD LOSS, FROZEN COLD IN WINTER, OVERCUMING, AVOIDABLE DISEASE, AND ANOTHER DISEASED INDIVIDUAL DISEASES AMENITIES AND MEDICAL CARE.

THERE IS THEREFORE A SERIOUS AND ACUTE EMERGENCY SITUATION, IN WHICH THE CHILDREN STAND AS A VICTIM OF THEIR PARENTS.
AND ACCORDING TO MY JUDGMENT THE STATE IS BASED ON THE BASIS OF THE
SOCIAL CAREFULNESS AND TO THE EXTENT INSIDE HIS POWER:
TO ATTRACT THE WRITING LOT OF THOSE DUTCH CHILDREN.
AND THE STATE MUST REASONALLY TAKE POSSIBLE MEASURES TO PROTECT THESE DUTCH CHILDREN.
THE CHILDREN ARE ALSO IN ANOTHER STATE. “
FROM THE JUDGMENT OF THE JUDGMENT RELATING TO RECOVERING IS CHILDREN
BY THE DUTCH STATE
SEE SOURCE
WE
JUDGMENT: THE NETHERLANDS SHOULD MAKE A DIFFICULTY TO RECOVER IS CHILDREN
[41]
CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD
[42]
“Really cliff and ready
Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.
Our way of life, we just talked about homosexuality, we talk about man and woman in the Netherlands.
We are talking about our achievements, which come from humanism, from Enlightenment, which we have in hundreds of years
built up “
 SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES
MARK RUTTE
[43]
CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD
[44]

Article 3

1. In all actions concerning children, whether undertaken by public or private social welfare institutions, courts of law, administrative authorities or legislative bodies, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration.

http://hrlibrary.umn.edu/instree/k2crc.htm

Article 2

1. States Parties shall respect and ensure the rights set forth in the present Convention to each child within their jurisdiction without discrimination of any kind, irrespective of the child’s or his or her parent’s or legal guardian’s race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national, ethnic or social origin, property, disability, birth or other status.

http://hrlibrary.umn.edu/instree/k2crc.htm

 

Article 6

1. States Parties recognize that every child has the inherent right to life.

http://hrlibrary.umn.edu/instree/k2crc.htm

Article 19

1. States Parties shall take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect the child from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse, while in the care of parent(s), legal guardian(s) or any other person who has the care of the child.

http://hrlibrary.umn.edu/instree/k2crc.htm

Article 24

1. States Parties recognize the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. States Parties shall strive to ensure that no child is deprived of his or her right of access to such health care services.

http://hrlibrary.umn.edu/instree/k2crc.htm

Article 28

1. States Parties recognize the right of the child to education, and with a view to achieving this right progressively and on the basis of equal opportunity, they shall, in particular:

(a) Make primary education compulsory and available free to all;

(b) Encourage the development of different forms of secondary education, including general and vocational education, make them available and accessible to every child, and take appropriate measures such as the introduction of free education and offering financial assistance in case of need;

(c) Make higher education accessible to all on the basis of capacity by every appropriate means;

(d) Make educational and vocational information and guidance available and accessible to all children;

(e) Take measures to encourage regular attendance at schools and the reduction of drop-out rates.

2. States Parties shall take all appropriate measures to ensure that school discipline is administered in a manner consistent with the child’s human dignity and in conformity with the present Convention.

3. States Parties shall promote and encourage international cooperation in matters relating to education, in particular with a view to contributing to the elimination of ignorance and illiteracy throughout the world and facilitating access to scientific and technical knowledge and modern teaching methods. In this regard, particular account shall be taken of the needs of developing countries.

http://hrlibrary.umn.edu/instree/k2crc.htm

[45]
WE
CABIN IN PROFESSION AGAINST JUDGMENT IS CHILDREN
TEXT

The cabinet will appeal the  ruling of the Hague court  about the recovery of IS children. Ministers Grapperhaus and Blok write this to the Lower House.

The judge in summary proceedings yesterday ruled that the Netherlands should make efforts to collect 56 children of Dutch IS members as quickly as possible from detention camps in Syria. Their mothers are not entitled to repatriation. But if the local authorities only allow the children to go with their mothers, the Netherlands must also recover the mothers.

International relations

Grapperhaus and Blok write that the ruling raises questions “about a number of aspects that may not have been sufficiently taken into account, including international relations”. By appealing, the government wants clarity on this as soon as possible.

The ministers also announce that the Cabinet will start complying with the best efforts obligation imposed by the judge. The judge ruled that the judgment must be executed immediately.

According to lawyer Seebregts, who assists IS women, the appeal does not change the judgment of the judge. “We will keep our finger on the pulse,” he says.

Divided

Up to now, the government has always taken the position that travelers in principle will not receive help with their return if they cannot reach an embassy in Turkey or Iraq themselves. The government parties are  divided  on the issue. VVD and CDA especially emphasize that the court ruling may bring IS people to the Netherlands, with all the associated risks. D66 and ChristenUnie think it is a risk to have children of IS’ers in Syria radicalized.
[46]
[46]
Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.
 SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES
MARK RUTTE
[47]
Like I wrote:
One cuckoo flew out of the nest
A funny pun on the world famous film
ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST
WIKIPEDIA
ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST
[48]
“IS people deserve severe punishment. But I never find the death penalty acceptable, nowhere and for anyone, “said Blok on Friday.”
THE PAROOL
MINISTER DISCLAIMS WITH VVD ABOUT DEATH PENALTY FOR IS’ERS
NOVEMBER 8, 2019
TEXT
“IS people deserve a heavy penalty. But I never find the death penalty acceptable, nowhere and for anyone, ”said Blok on Friday. His ministry is committed to this ultimate punishment all over the world. Blok says he has always been against the death penalty, even when he was a member of the VVD faction.

Dutch people who fought for IS in Iraq and are tried there, can get the death penalty. VVD member Dilan Yeşilgöz-Zegerius wants to deal with this in a “pragmatic” way. “That can be the ultimate consequence.” Within the coalition, the VVD is alone.

Blok wants an international tribunal to try foreign IS’ers in Iraq. He is discussing this with the government in Baghdad. A major stumbling block is the death penalty. Furthermore, Iraq only wants to try foreign ISers who have committed crimes in Iraq.

[49]
SURINAME HERALD
Pronounced MINISTER BLOCK FRUITS ON RACISTIC CAKE
JULY 31, 2018
TEXT

Minister Blok’s attacks on Suriname as “Failed State”, the multicultural society, the “nuisance causing” Turkish baker and his reference to hostility towards strangers “deep in our genes”, exude dangerous backwardness and xenophobia.

Blok does not pretend to know a “peaceful” multi-ethnic and multicultural society in which the original population still lives. I have news for him: Medieval Spain under Moorish rule. The Surinamese society where no fewer than ten population groups live together peacefully!

Blok pretends that Suriname is a “Failed State” that has fallen apart without central authority, while the government and institutions are firmly standing and, contrary to Blok’s claims, the population groups live peacefully together. This is independent of the fact that Suriname has been a military dictatorship and that the chief suspect of the December murders, former army commander D. Bouterse, unfortunately, is president.

Sowing hatred and generalizing, Blok claims that the Turkish baker would be a nuisance without becoming concrete and pretends to “understand” the people of Amsterdam-West and the Schilderswijk, while the majority of those people live peacefully next to their immigrant neighbors, as does appears from angry letters.

He also suggests that racial delusion is “deep in our genes,” as if it were a natural phenomenon, while contemporary racism arose with the 17th century transatlantic slave trade.

Anyway. With his racist and ahistorical remarks, Blok has caused hatred in an already racist political climate. It would grace him if he resigned as quickly as possible!

Astrid Essed

Amsterdam
[50]
”Suriname is a ‘failed state’ and that is ‘due to ethnic division’, according to Minister of Foreign Affairs Stef Blok. This is apparent from the film images that ZEMBLA owns. Blok made the statement last Tuesday in The Hague during a meeting with Dutch people working for international organizations. The source, of which ZEMBLA received the recordings, says that many listeners were ‘shocked’ at what Blok said that afternoon. The source wishes to remain anonymous. “
BNNVARA
ZEMBLA
MINISTER STEF BLOK
SURINAME IS A FAILED STATE, BY
ETHNIC DIVISION
JULY 18, 2018
MINISTER BLOK: “I DID NOT KNOW MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY,
WHO IS PEACEFUL ”
JULY 18, 2018

I am very pragmatic about xenophobia.

I put the question out at my Ministry, but I also do it here.
Give me an example of a multi ethnic or multicultural society, where the
native population still lives – and then Australia and the
The United States, because the original population has been exterminated there-
A multi ethnic, multi cultural society, where the original
population still lives and where there is a peaceful cohabitation.
I do not know him”
IMAGES OF THIS DECISION CAN BE FOUND IN THE FOLLOWING
LINK
BNNVARA
ZEMBLA
MINISTER STEF BLOK: “SURINAME IS A FAILED STATE, BY ETHNIC
DIVISION “
JULY 18, 2018
CRITICISM:
STATEMENT MINISTER BLOCK / FRUITS ON RACISTIC CAKE / SURINAME AS “FAILED STATE”, TURKISH BAKER AND “OUR GENES”
ASTRID ESSED
JULY 27, 2018

https://www.astridessed.nl/ pronunciations-minister-blok-vruchten-on-racist-cake-suriname-als-failed-state-turkish-baker-and-our-genes/

[51]
“” But lateral support for the death penalty does not support the JOVD. Not now, not ever! ”
Jovd
JOVD: “THE VVD GOES AWAY FROM THE LIBERAL PATH AND WILL ALWAYS BE MORE A” LAW AND ORDER “PARTY
NOVEMBER 12, 2019
TEXT
The death penalty can never be justified in the protection of individuals. If the VVD does, the party will seriously deviate from the liberal path, argue chairman Rick Oudshoorn and board member Anouk van Brug of the JOVD.

In the parliamentary debate last Wednesday about men and women traveling to Syria, something happened that a liberal must abhor. In the parliamentary debate, the VVD, the largest liberal party in the Netherlands, accepted that Dutch Syrians could qualify for the death penalty when tried in Iraq. The Dutch government, the VVD and the JOVD (Youth Organization for Freedom and Democracy) have always indicated that they want to try IS people where they have committed war crimes: the former ISP caliphate, for this matter it is mainly about Iraq. Trying there has many advantages. There is better evidence and there is no chance of returning former terrorists to Dutch society. We therefore wholeheartedly support the acquisition of Dutch citizenship. But lateral support for the death penalty does not support the JOVD. Not now, not ever!

It is becoming increasingly clear that the VVD is increasingly becoming a “law and order” party, which has less and less of liberalism. The JOVD naturally supports the line that trial must take place in the region, which ensures a safer Netherlands. But accepting the death penalty as the ultimate consequence is anything but liberal. Certainly for a country and a party that is fighting internationally for human rights. However, the VVD states that it wants to be pragmatic in the negotiations with Iraq about the trial of Dutchmen and European IS fighters before the Iraqi court. And although liberalism is not dogmatic, it does have limits. The basic idea of ​​liberalism protects individuals, from the collective.

International tribunal

Liberalism favors strong democracy and underlines the importance of good justice in a strong rule of law. Now the VVD is trying to do this by keeping IS fighters out, because the freedom of the one goes as far as where the freedom of the other begins. But in the protection of individuals, the death penalty can never be justified. Now the plea of ​​Dilan Yeşilgöz in the room was not entirely the justification of the death penalty, it scoured it very close. It raises the question of whether the core beliefs of prominent VVD MPs such as Dilan Yeşilgöz represent the core beliefs of the VVD. If that is the case, the VVD will seriously deviate from the liberal path. Liberalism is broadly interpretable, but it is not purely pragmatic, the historical awareness of the VVD should underline that.

The JOVD also understands that a solution is not easy, and that retrieving IS’ers is not negotiable, but this path is not correct. A proposal that has not yet come to the fore is the establishment of an international tribunal in Iraq without the death penalty. Should the VVD embrace and implement this proposal, they will not only embark on a more straightforward liberal path. They also ensure that trial takes place in Iraq, but on our terms. We want to call on the parliamentary group of the VVD to make less crude statements that are not in line with what liberals have fought for in the course of history. Dare to look ahead, but never forget the past.
[52]
“It is a difficult point, partly because the Iraqis use the death penalty in their legal system. A punishment that we as a country, and also as VVD, certainly do not support. “
VVD
DILAN YESILGOZ ABOUT RETURN FROM IS WARRIORS
TEXT

Our MP  Dilan Yesilgöz-Zegerius  does not want to know anything about the return of IS terrorists to the Netherlands. Her answer to the many questions she received.

There has been a lot going on around IS fighters lately. Do we have to bring them back to the Netherlands? Should we treat IS women differently from IS men? How do we deal with the children? And how do we ensure that it stays safe in the Netherlands?

It is difficult matter, with a lot of dilemmas. I think we soon agree that the men who have joined IS there and have fought against everything we stand for here no longer belong in our country. Let them be persecuted where they fought. There are the witnesses, there the victims have fallen, that is where the trial belongs.

I notice that some people find it more difficult when it comes to the women of these IS men. Indeed, there are those who believe that these women would not be responsible for the atrocities committed by IS. But the reality shows that these women facilitated or even participated in the fight. They, too, knowingly traveled to the IS area to work on slavery, rape and other forms of violence. They are not naive, docile women. They are women who, as far as the VVD is concerned, have just as well lost the right to be Dutch. And they should also be tried locally as far as we are concerned.

We are currently, at the initiative of Minister Blok, in consultation with the Iraqis and other European countries about what this local trial could look like. It is a difficult point, partly because the Iraqis use the death penalty in their legal system. A punishment that we as a country, and also as a VVD, are certainly not in favor of. We will always try to move other countries to abandon the death penalty, but we cannot force them. And in the end we really want them to be tried there, where the witnesses are, where the victims have fallen and where there are the best chances for a good file structure. That is preferable to trial in our country, which often means in practice that jihadists are walking down the street after a maximum of a few years in prison. That is a big risk for the VVD.

And then there are the children. Who have not chosen to go to IS territory themselves. They were sometimes too small to know what is going on there and what their parents are working on. I regularly hear that people think we should not leave these children to their own devices. And I understand that very well, I also struggle with this. Of course we believe that children there should receive care on the spot. However, we do not think they should come back to the Netherlands. This has a number of important reasons. In addition to the fact that it is unsafe to pick them up in that area and we do not know to what extent these children are indoctrinated and can pose a danger to our society, there is another big risk. If we bring these children here, there is a great risk that the parents will follow. Various international laws and treaties oblige us to let the parents also come to our country for family reunification. The unsafe situation that arises is something the VVD wants to prevent.

Are these always easy decisions and positions? No. On the contrary. The dilemmas are enormous. But the importance of keeping it safe in the Netherlands is always a priority for me.
[53]
FAITHFUL
VVD FIND THE DEATH PENALTY FOR DUTCH IS’ERS ACCEPTABLE
NOVEMBER 7, 2019
[54]
Are these always easy decisions and positions? No. On the contrary. The dilemmas are huge. “
VVD
DILAN YESILGOZ ABOUT RETURN FROM IS WARRIORS
[55]
Really clear and readyOur achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model
 SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES
MARK RUTTE
[56]
But accepting the death penalty as the ultimate consequence is anything but liberal. Certainly for a country and a party that is fighting internationally for human rights. “
Jovd
JOVD: “THE VVD GOES AWAY FROM THE LIBERAL PATH AND WILL ALWAYS BE MORE A” LAW AND ORDER “PARTY
NOVEMBER 12, 2019

https://jovd.nl/nieuws/jovd_%E2%80%98de_vvd_dwaalt_af_van_het_liberale_pad_en_wordt_steeds_meer_een_%E2%80%98law_and_order%E2%80%99_ Partij%E2%80%99

[57]

“We feel a growing discomfort when people abuse our freedom to steal everything here, while they have just come to our country for that freedom. People who do not want to adapt, abandon our habits and reject our values. Harassing gays, cheering women in short skirts, or turning ordinary Dutch people into racists. I understand very well that people think: if you reject our country so fundamentally, I’d rather you leave. I also have that feeling. Do normal or leave. ”

MARK RUTTE

LETTER TO ALL DUTCHERS

https://vvd.nl/nieuws/lees-hie r-de-brief-van-mark / https://vvd.nl/content/uploads /2017/01/briefvanmark.pdf T

[58]

SEE STUDIES / PROPOSALS FROM THE VVD IN THE FOLLOWING LINK XENOFOBE

RACISM IN THE POLICY / DISTRIBUTING STATEMENTS AND PROPOSALS OF DUTCH POLITICIANS

ASTRID ESSED

NOVEMBER 1, 2019

https://www.astridessed.nl/racisme-in-de-politiek-distressing- pronunciations-and- proposals-of-nederlandse-politici/

[59]

[59]
CIDI
MINISTER HENNIS VISITS ISRAEL
MAY 28, 2014
TEXT

Defense Minister Hennis-Plasschaert paid a working visit to Israel to improve defense cooperation. She did this from 18 to 20 May at the invitation of her Israeli colleague, Minister Moshe Ya’alom. On this occasion, both parties signed an agreement to further intensify cooperation in the field of training, practice and information exchange.

During her stay, the minister paid working visits to the headquarters of Elbit and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI). Elbit is a company that develops anti-aircraft guns, camera systems and other high-tech for the military aircraft industry. Among other things, they also make parts for the German and American air forces. Together with the IAI, they are involved in the production of the F-35 fighter plane, which both countries have purchased for their air force.

Hennis also visited the Dutch embassy where she spoke with various representatives of the Dutch armed forces who are on a mission in the Middle East (UNDOF, UNTSO, USSC and MFO). The minister also visited the Yad-Vashem Museum in Jerusalem, where she laid a wreath for the victims of the Holocaust.

The ambassador of the Netherlands to Israel, Caspar Veldkamp, ​​said about the visit: “This visit marks the good relations between the two countries, including our cooperation in the field of defense.” During a lunch, Minister Hennis also invited her Israeli colleague minister to to visit the Netherlands.
OFFICIAL DISCLOSURES
SITUATION IN THE MIDDLE EAST
TEXT
ROOM PIECE
Date of publication Organization Meeting year File and subnumber
23-05-2014 Second Chamber of the States General 2013-2014 23432 No. 372

23 432 The situation in the Middle East

Nr. 372 LETTER FROM THE MINISTER OF DEFENSE

To the President of the Lower House of the States General

The Hague, May 19, 2014

Today I visited the Israeli defense minister. The visit is in line with the government’s aim to deepen bilateral ties with Israel at various levels, as set out in the letter of 19 December 2013 (Parliamentary Document  23 432, no. 357 ).

As is known, the Netherlands and Israel have been working together on defense for some time. I believe it is important to make further agreements on the status of the visiting staff and on implementation aspects, such as finances. We have signed a joint statement to this end today (see Appendix 1 ).

At present, defense cooperation with Israel mainly concerns the following aspects:

  • – Use of Israeli training facilities by soldiers of the Command Force Corps (a few weeks in 2012 and 2014);
  • – Exchange of knowledge on technical aspects of remote-controlled aircraft;
  • – Exchange of knowledge about measures against improvised explosives (IEDs);
  • – Knowledge exchange about cyber;
  • – Mutual participation in courses, training and seminars.

The activities are in line with government policy with regard to Israel and are carried out within the internationally recognized borders of both countries. The most important aspects of cooperation are discussed in the annual report on the state of affairs of international military cooperation. As usual, you will receive a further report following my visit.

The Minister of Defense,

JA Hennis-Plasschaert

[60]
THE ILLEGALITY OF THE DUTCH SINGLE ILLUSTRAL
ACCORDING TO ARTICLE 49, 4th CONVENTION OF GENEVA, THE HAGUE TREATY OF 1907
”Individual or mass forcible transfers, as well as deportations of protected persons from occupied territory to the territory of the Occupying Power or to that of any other country, occupied or not, are prohibited, regardless of their motive.”
ARTICLE 49, FOURTH GENEVA CONVENTION
COMPLETE TEXT
DEPORTATIONS, TRANSFERS, EVACUATIONS
ARTICLE 49 [ Link ]Individual or mass forcible transfers, as well as deportations of protected persons from occupied territory to the territory of the Occupying Power or to that of any other country, occupied or not, are prohibited, regardless of their motive.
Nevertheless, the Occupying Power may undertake total or partial evacuation of a given area if the security of the population or imperative military reasons so demand. Such evacuations may not involve the displacement of protected persons outside the bounds of the occupied territory except when for material reasons it is impossible to avoid such displacement. Persons thus evacuated shall be transferred back to their homes as soon as hostilities in the area in question have ceased.
The Occupying Power undertaking such transfers or evacuations shall ensure, to the greatest practicable extent, that proper accommodation is provided to receive the protected persons, that the removals are effected in satisfactory conditions of hygiene, health, safety and nutrition, and that members of the same family are not separated.
The Protecting Power shall be informed of any transfers and evacuations as soon as they have taken place.
The Occupying Power shall not detain protected persons in an area particularly exposed to the dangers of war unless the security of the population or imperative military reasons so demand.
The Occupying Power shall not deport or transfer parts of its own civilian population into the territory it occupies.
THE HAGUE CONVENTION 1907
Moreover, the Fourth Geneva Convention contains the famous ban on colonizing occupied territory on which the international community – including the Netherlands – relies on its condemnations of Israel’s settlement policy. “
 THE RIGHTS FORUM VIOLATIONS
EXPANSION OF Settlements

AL JAZEERAISRAEL APPROVES 2300 NEW HOMES FOR SETTLERS IN WESTBANK: NGO

6 AUGUST 2019

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/08/israel-approves-2300-homes-settlers-west-bank-ngo-190806161537292.html

THE HAARETZISRAEL APPROVES 1450 NEW HOMES IN WEST BANK SETTLEMENTS

DECEMBER 26, 2018

https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/israel-approves-1-450-new-homes-in-west-bank-settlements-1.6785734

THE WASHINGTON POSTISRAEL APPROVES PLANS FOR THOUSANDS OF NEWSETTLEMENT UNITS IN THE WESTBANK10 OCTOBER 2017

[61]

CITIZEN OF THE WORLD

SWEDISH PHOTOGRAPHER WINS WORLD PRESS PHOTO 2012.

CRIMES ISRAELIC POLITICS BROUGHT INTO IMAGES

ASTRID ESSED

https://www.civismundi.nl/?p=artikel&aid=2024

BTSELEM.ORGFATALITIES DURING OPERATION CAST LEAD

https://www.btselem.org/statistics/fatalities/during-cast-lead/by-date-of-event

BTSELEM.ORGFATALITIES DURING OPERATION PROTECTIVE EDGE

https://www.btselem.org/2014_gaza_conflict/en/

AMNESTY INTERNATIONALOPERATION CAST LEAD: 22 DAYS OF DEATH AND DESTRUCTION2009

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/48000/mde150152009en.pdf

“During 50 days of attacks, Israeli forces wreaked massive death and destruction on the Gaza Strip, killing close to 1,500 civilians, more than 500 of whom were children,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Middle East and North Africa Programme Director.”

AMNESTY INTERNATIONALISRAEL/OPT: TWO YEARS ON, STILL NO JUSTICE FORWAR CRIMES VICTIMS7 JULY 2016

https://www.amnesty.org/en/lat est/news/2016/07/israel-opt-tw o-years-on-still-no-justice-fo r-war-crimes-victims/

AMNESTY INTERNATIONALISRAEL/OPT: USE OF EXCESSIVE FORCE IN GAZA AN ABHORRENTVIOLATION OF INTERNATIONAL LAW14 MAY 2018

https://www.amnesty.org/en/lat est/news/2018/05/israelopt-use -of-excessive-force-in-gaza-an -abhorrent-violation-of-intern ational-law/

[62]

FAITHFUL
VVD FIND THE DEATH PENALTY FOR DUTCH IS’ERS ACCEPTABLE
NOVEMBER 7, 2019
[63]
Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.
 SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES
MARK RUTTE
[64]
” ” Our achievements, with our norms and values, it is all or nothing it is not a cafeteria model.
Our way of life, we just talked about homosexuality, we talk about man and woman in the Netherlands.
We are talking about our achievements, which come from humanism, from Enlightenment, that we have built up over hundreds of years. “
 SUMMER GUESTS IN FIVE MINUTES
MARK RUTTE
[65]

 “A punishment that we as a country, and also as a VVD, are certainly not in favor of.”

VVD
DILAN YESILGOZ ABOUT RETURN FROM IS WARRIORS
[66]
FAITHFUL
VVD FIND THE DEATH PENALTY FOR DUTCH IS’ERS ACCEPTABLE
NOVEMBER 7, 2019
[67]
Article 2 Right to life 1. Everyone has the right to life. 2. No one is sentenced to death or executed. “
CHARTER OF FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION
‘“Capital punishment is inhumane and unnecessary. Experience has also shown that it does not serve as a deterrent to crime. No legal system is flawless; any miscarriage of justice could lead to the tragic loss of an innocent life. ”
EUROPEAN UNION
JOINT DECLARATION  BY TJORBJORN JAGLAND, SECRETARY GENERAL OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE AND CATHERINE ASHTON, EUROPEAN UNION HIGH REPRESENTATIVE FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND SECURITY POLICY, ON THE EUROPEAN AND WORLD DAY AGAINST THE DEATH PENALTY, 10 OCTOBER 2012
“The EU is the largest sponsor in the fight against the death penalty worldwide. All EU countries have abolished the death penalty in accordance with the  European Convention on Human Rights . “
NEWS
EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT
PUNCTION: IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT THE SITUATION IN EUROPE AND THE REST OF THE WORLD
12 MARCH 2019
[68]
WE
DISPOSAL IN COALITION: VVD FINDS DEATH PENALTY DUTCH IS’ERS ACCEPTABLE
NOVEMBER 6, 2019
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The VVD ruling party finds it acceptable that Dutch IS men and women receive the death penalty in Iraq if they are tried there. This became apparent during a parliamentary debate on jihadists.

If Iraq only wants to cooperate in a court for foreign IS’ers if the death penalty is allowed to remain, then the VVD wants to be “pragmatic”. VVD MP Yesilgöz: “That is the ultimate consequence.”

Governmental partners CDA and D66 do not agree with the VVD. They find the consequences for the Netherlands as a country that fight internationally against the death penalty and for human rights too great.

“The fact is that if we were to accept the death penalty in this case, we would have to cancel our European and international treaties,” says CDA MP Van Toorenburg.

Stumbling blocks

D66 MP Sjoerdsma thinks it will be more difficult for the Minister of Foreign Affairs to protest against the death penalty abroad, for example when it concerns LGBT people or Dutch convicts.

The death penalty is one of the major stumbling blocks to the trial of Dutch and other European IS in Iraq. The country is not prepared to adapt the legal system to European standards.

The parliamentary debate was interrupted before Ministers Blok and Grapperhaus were able to respond in connection with the events  at Schiphol .
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